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More GI Symptoms, Less Anxiety With Tryptophan Supplementation in IBS new
      #306073 - 04/28/07 10:18 AM
HeatherAdministrator

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More GI Symptoms, Less Anxiety With Tryptophan Supplementation in IBS

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) Dec 21 - Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have an increase in gastrointestinal symptoms after ingestion of a large dose of tryptophan, according to a new study. At the same time, they report having fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression.

British researchers, led by Dr. Jonathan Shufflebotham of the University of Bristol, studied 18 patients with ROME II-defined IBS and 11 age-matched controls. The subjects were evaluated during a phase of acute tryptophan depletion and a phase of acute tryptophan increase.

Participants ate a low-protein diet on the day before each phase of the study and fasted from midnight to 9:00 am on the day of intervention. Baseline levels of tryptophan were measured on that day and patients completed a questionnaire, answering questions about IBS symptoms and symptoms of anxiety and depression.

During acute tryptophan increase, subjects drank a concoction containing 2.3 g tryptophan, 150 ml water, 100 ml flavoring of their choice and 2 spoons of sugar. During acute tryptophan depletion, subjects drank the same drink without the addition of tryptophan.

Total and free plasma concentrations of tryptophan decreased 73% in both patients and controls during tryptophan depletion and increased approximately 60% on the day of supplementation.

IBS patients reported more gastrointestinal symptoms but less anxiety with acute tryptophan increase compared with acute tryptophan depletion. Controls did not have a difference in symptomatology on either day. IBS patients had lower mood scores overall than controls during all phases of the study.

In the study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology, Dr. Shufflebotham and colleagues write that the findings "suggest a difference in serotonergic functioning between these two groups and provides evidence to support the hypothesis that 5-HT dysfunction is involved in IBS."

IBS symptoms respond to treatment with 5-HT4 agonists and 5-HT3 antagonists in some IBS patients, the researchers note. And, "the differing direction of GI and anxiety symptom responses to 5-HT manipulation is counterintuitive but intriguing."

"Further researcher is now needed to clarify which parts of the 5-HT system are dysfunctional in IBS and how this relates to the symptoms experienced by patients with this condition," the team concludes.

Am J Gastroenterol 2006;101:2582-2587.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/549778

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Is there any food I can eat? Living with inflammatory bowel disease and/or irritable bowel syndrome. new
      #309451 - 06/20/07 02:16 PM
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Clin Nurse Spec. 2006 Sep-Oct;20(5):241-7.

Is there any food I can eat? Living with inflammatory bowel disease and/or irritable bowel syndrome.

Fletcher PC, Schneider MA.

Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3C5.

INTRODUCTION: Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) and irritable bowel syndrome are chronic, debilitating gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. There are no known causes of inflammatory bowel disease and/or irritable bowel syndrome. Both of these GI conditions significantly impair quality of life and the ability to complete activities of daily living. Unfortunately, there has been little education and research surrounding the evaluation of effective coping strategies with respect to GI disorders, particularly from the perspective of those diagnosed. As such, exploring the strategies of individuals with GI disorders would provide information concerning coping strategies from the perspective of those afflicted.

PURPOSE: The overall objective of this research was to explore the lived experience of women who had been diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease and/or irritable bowel syndrome. This article specifically explores the relationship between food and irritable bowel syndrome and/or inflammatory bowel disease.

METHODS: Eight females, diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease and/or irritable bowel syndrome, were recruited via on-campus posters from a university in southern Ontario, Canada. Qualitative information was collected in the form of background questionnaires, e-mail interviews, and face-to-face interviews, which were subsequently analyzed for trends.

RESULTS: Every woman reported that one of the most significant means by which to cope with their condition centered around food consumption or controlling their food consumption. Subjects identified the importance of determining their "trigger foods," selecting healthy food choices, the impact of stress, and problems associated with food and travel.

CONCLUSIONS: This research, predicated on the narratives of women diagnosed with GI disorders, substantiates the profound effect that food has on conditions of the GI tract. All of the women identified their relationship with food as a dynamic learning process, one that they thought would be a lifelong struggle. The implications for community health nurses in assisting individuals with GI disorders are discussed.

PMID: 16980794 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=16980794&ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus

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Therapeutic effects of eliminating allergic foods according to food-specific IgG antibodies in irritable bowel syndrome new
      #318170 - 11/07/07 02:42 PM
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Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi. 2007 Aug;46(8):641-3.

[The therapeutic effects of eliminating allergic foods according to food-specific IgG antibodies in irritable bowel syndrome]

Yang CM, Li YQ.

Department of Digestive Disease, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan 250021, China.

OBJECTIVE: To explore the therapeutic effects on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by eliminating the allergic foods according to food-specific IgG antibodies and to clarify the etiopathological role and mechanism of food allergy.

METHODS: The food-specific IgG antibodies to a panel of 14 different food antigens in serum were detected with ELISA in fifty five cases with diarrhea-dominant IBS, thirty two with constipation-dominant IBS and eighteen normal controls. The frequency and severity index of symptoms and scores of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Quality of Life (IBS-QOL) in thirty five cases with positive food-specific IgG were observed before and after elimination of allergic foods for two months.

RESULTS: The positive rate of serum food-specific IgG antibodies was 63.6 percent in patients with diarrhea-dominant IBS and 43.8 percent in constipation-dominant IBS. Both were higher than that in normal controls. After eliminating allergic foods for four weeks according to the levels of serum food-specific IgG antibodies, the frequency of symptoms decreased from (3.79 +/- 1.58) to (1.67 +/- 0.70) per week and the severity from 3.18 +/- 1.46 to 1.52 +/- 0.67 with significant differences. After eight weeks, the frequency of symptoms decreased from (3.79 +/- 1.58) to (1.53 +/- 0.69) per week and the severity from 3.18 +/- 1.46 to 1.45 +/- 0.66, also with significant differences. After eliminating allergic foods, the overall health score and the eight dimensionality integrals of QOL except avoiding food in patients with IBS increased significantly than those before treatment. At the end of eight weeks, the symptoms relieved completely in 31.4 percent of the cases and remarkably in 34.3 percent.

CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal immune reactions mediated by IgG antibodies coexisted in patients with IBS. It is of great significance in treating IBS by eliminating the allergic foods according to the serum level of food-specific IgG antibodies.

PMID: 17967233 [PubMed - in process]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=17967233&ordinalpos=10&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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Role of dietary fructose and fructans in initiating symptoms of IBS in fructose malabsorbers new
      #334188 - 08/07/08 12:20 PM
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Volume 6, Issue 7, Pages 765-771 (July 2008)

Dietary Triggers of Abdominal Symptoms in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Randomized Placebo-Controlled Evidence
Findings in this article have been presented at the Australian Gastroenterology Week, October 2006 and an abstract published as follows: Shepherd S, Gibson PR. Role of dietary fructose and fructans in initiating symptoms of IBS in fructose malabsorbers. J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2006;18(Suppl):B102.

Susan J. Shepherd, Francis C. Parker, Jane G. Muir, Peter R. Gibson


published online 06 May 2008.

Background & Aims: Observational studies suggest dietary fructose restriction might lead to sustained symptomatic response in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and fructose malabsorption. The aims of this study were first to determine whether the efficacy of this dietary change is due to dietary fructose restriction and second to define whether symptom relief was specific to free fructose or to poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates in general. Methods: The double-blinded, randomized, quadruple arm, placebo-controlled rechallenge trial took place in the general community. The 25 patients who had responded to dietary change were provided all food, low in free fructose and fructans, for the duration of the study. Patients were randomly challenged by graded dose introduction of fructose, fructans, alone or in combination, or glucose taken as drinks with meals for maximum test period of 2 weeks, with at least 10-day washout period between. For the main outcome measures, symptoms were monitored by daily diary entries and responses to a global symptom question. Results: Seventy percent of patients receiving fructose, 77% receiving fructans, and 79% receiving a mixture reported symptoms were not adequately controlled, compared with 14% receiving glucose (P ≤ 0.002, McNemar test). Similarly, the severity of overall and individual symptoms was significantly and markedly less for glucose than other substances. Symptoms were induced in a dose-dependent manner and mimicked previous IBS symptoms. Conclusions: In patients with IBS and fructose malabsorption, dietary restriction of fructose and/or fructans is likely to be responsible for symptomatic improvement, suggesting efficacy is due to restriction of poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates in general.

Abbreviations used in this paper: FM, fructose malabsorption, FODMAPs, Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides, and Polyols, IBS, irritable bowel syndrome, ITT, intention to treat, PP, per protocol, VAS, visual analogue scale
Department of Gastroenterology and Monash University Department of Medicine, Box Hill Hospital, Victoria, Australia

Address requests for reprints to: Ms Sue Shepherd, Department of Medicine, Box Hill Hospital, Box Hill, Victoria 3128, Australia. fax: +61-3-9895-0352.

Susan J. Shepherd was supported by a National Health & Medical Research Council postgraduate biomedical scholarship. Foods were donated by the following organizations: ACI packaging, Advanced Brockerage Australia (Liddell's), Bundaberg Sugar, Cerebos Foods, Coles supermarket, Confoil Pty Ltd, Country Life, Duncan Davis Smallgoods, Findus, Freedom Foods (Aust) Pty Ltd, Goodman Fielder Pty Ltd, Greens General Foods Pty Ltd, Heinz, Ingham chicken, Lactos Pty Ltd, Massel Australia Pty Ltd, McCormick Foods Australia Pty Ltd, National Foods, Orgran (Roma Foods), Pace Farm Pty Ltd, Pakval, Purewater, Riviana Foods, Silly Yaks, Simplot Australia Pty Ltd, Sunrice, The Smiths Snackfood Company Ltd, Trialia Foods, Uncle Rick's, Virgona Fruit and Vegetables.

Susan J. Shepherd has published three cookbooks directed toward issues of fructose malabsorption and celiac disease. The term FODMAPs has been registered by Susan Shepherd and Peter Gibson.

We thank Lance Schiapulus for developing and formulating the test drinks, Nia Rosella and Rosemary Rose for technical support, and Paul Rose, Kathryn Stephens, and Martin Shepherd for logistical support.

PII: S1542-3565(08)00151-1

doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2008.02.058

2008 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

http://journals.elsevierhealth.com/periodicals/yjcgh/article/S1542-3565(08)00151-1/abstract

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Dietary changes highly acceptable to IBS patients new
      #343426 - 03/18/09 05:51 PM
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BMC Complement Altern Med. 2008 Dec 19;8:65.


Treatments for irritable bowel syndrome: patients' attitudes and acceptability.

Harris LR, Roberts L.
Primary Care Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK.

BACKGROUND: Irritable Bowel Syndrome, a highly prevalent chronic disorder, places significant burden on the health service and the individual. Symptomatic distress and reduced quality of life are compounded by few efficacious treatments available. As researchers continue to demonstrate the clinical efficacy of alternative therapies, it would be useful to gain a patient-perspective of treatment acceptability and identify patient's attitudes towards those modalities considered not acceptable.

METHODS: Six hundred and forty-five participants identified from an earlier IBS-prevalence study received a postal questionnaire to evaluate preferences and acceptability of nine forms of treatment. Proportions accepting each form of treatment were calculated and thematic analysis of qualitative data undertaken.

RESULTS: A total of 256 (39.7%) of 645 potential respondents completed the questionnaire (mean age 55.9 years, 73% female). Tablets were most acceptable (84%), followed by lifestyle changes (diet (82%), yoga (77%)). Acupuncture (59%) and suppositories (57%) were less acceptable. When explaining lack of acceptability, patient views fell into four broad categories: dislike treatment modality, do not perceive benefit, general barriers and insufficient knowledge. Scepticism, lack of scientific rationale and fear of CAM were mentioned, although others expressed a dislike of conventional medical treatments. Past experiences, age and health concerns, and need for proof of efficacy were reported.

CONCLUSION: Most patients were willing to accept various forms of treatment. However, the reservations expressed by this patient-population must be recognised with particular focus directed towards allaying fears and misconceptions, seeking further evidence base for certain therapies and incorporating physician support and advice.

PMID: 19099570 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID: PMC2633319

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19099570?ordinalpos=4&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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Meat intake and mortality new
      #345330 - 04/30/09 01:16 PM
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Arch Intern Med. 2009 Mar 23;169(6):562-71.

Meat intake and mortality: a prospective study of over half a million people.

Sinha R, Cross AJ, Graubard BI, Leitzmann MF, Schatzkin A.
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute-Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Rockville, MD 20852, USA.

BACKGROUND: High intakes of red or processed meat may increase the risk of mortality. Our objective was to determine the relations of red, white, and processed meat intakes to risk for total and cause-specific mortality.

METHODS: The study population included the National Institutes of Health-AARP (formerly known as the American Association of Retired Persons) Diet and Health Study cohort of half a million people aged 50 to 71 years at baseline. Meat intake was estimated from a food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression models estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) within quintiles of meat intake. The covariates included in the models were age, education, marital status, family history of cancer (yes/no) (cancer mortality only), race, body mass index, 31-level smoking history, physical activity, energy intake, alcohol intake, vitamin supplement use, fruit consumption, vegetable consumption, and menopausal hormone therapy among women. Main outcome measures included total mortality and deaths due to cancer, cardiovascular disease, injuries and sudden deaths, and all other causes.

RESULTS: There were 47 976 male deaths and 23 276 female deaths during 10 years of follow-up. Men and women in the highest vs lowest quintile of red (HR, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.27-1.35], and HR, 1.36 [95% CI, 1.30-1.43], respectively) and processed meat (HR, 1.16 [95% CI, 1.12-1.20], and HR, 1.25 [95% CI, 1.20-1.31], respectively) intakes had elevated risks for overall mortality. Regarding cause-specific mortality, men and women had elevated risks for cancer mortality for red (HR, 1.22 [95% CI, 1.16-1.29], and HR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.12-1.30], respectively) and processed meat (HR, 1.12 [95% CI, 1.06-1.19], and HR, 1.11 [95% CI 1.04-1.19], respectively) intakes. Furthermore, cardiovascular disease risk was elevated for men and women in the highest quintile of red (HR, 1.27 [95% CI, 1.20-1.35], and HR, 1.50 [95% CI, 1.37-1.65], respectively) and processed meat (HR, 1.09 [95% CI, 1.03-1.15], and HR, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.26-1.51], respectively) intakes. When comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of white meat intake, there was an inverse association for total mortality and cancer mortality, as well as all other deaths for both men and women.

CONCLUSION: Red and processed meat intakes were associated with modest increases in total mortality, cancer mortality, and cardiovascular disease mortality.

PMID: 19307518 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19307518?ordinalpos=6&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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IBS Diet Cheat Sheet Celebrates 1 Million Downloads by Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients new
      #347141 - 06/12/09 11:09 AM
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IBS Diet Cheat Sheet Celebrates 1 Million Downloads by Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients

Irritable Bowel Syndrome patient-support site HelpForIBS.com features an IBS Diet Cheat Sheet that's seen 5 years of success and over one million downloads.

Seattle, WA (PRWEB) June 9, 2009 -- If you're new to the dietary management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome, learning what you can and can't eat without triggering painful symptoms can be an even more painful process.

To help IBS patients avoid this unnecessary struggle, best-selling author and HelpForIBS.com founder Heather Van Vorous (Eating for IBS, The First Year IBS) designed the IBS Diet Cheat Sheet - a free patient/doctor handout that provides the perfect way to keep critical IBS dietary information at hand.

"The IBS Diet Cheat Sheet uses an easy visual reference of red light, yellow light, and green light foods for IBS," says Van Vorous. "Red light foods are triggers to be avoided, yellow light foods should be eaten but only with caution, and green light foods are safe to eat. The lists are concise and easy to read at a glance, but also quite comprehensive."

The IBS Diet Cheat Sheet also includes the 10 Commandments of Eating for IBS, which explain how to eat, not just what to eat. Commandments such as "Practice creative substitution, not deprivation," "Always eat soluble fiber first," and "Minimize your fat intake to 25% of your diet, max" are among the quick tips that help ward off IBS attacks.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome affects up to 20% of the population and symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, bloating and gas are can either be triggered or prevented through diet. The IBS Diet Cheat Sheet gives patients the dietary information they need to avoid problems and gain control.

The free cheat sheet is downloadable here http://www.helpforibs.com/diet/heathersibscheatsheet.pdf and is meant to be carried, taped to the fridge, or kept in the car for traveling. Just five years after its creation the IBS Diet Cheat Sheet has reached over one million people and counting.

About HelpForIBS.com
HelpForIBS.com is the largest IBS community on the internet, with over 5 million visits per year and a membership of over 90,000 subscribers. HelpForIBS.com is dedicated to serving people with IBS, by offering education, support, and products that allow people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome to successfully manage their symptoms through simple and safe lifestyle modifications. HelpForIBS.com was founded by Heather Van Vorous, an IBS author and a sufferer since age 9. Heather's groundbreaking work in the IBS dietary field has led to her inclusion in Marquis Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare, has been licensed by Novartis pharmaceuticals, and has been publicized worldwide by physicians, IBS organizations, and patients.


http://www.prweb.com/releases/2009/06/prweb2452654.htm

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Soluble Fiber Helps IBS, Insoluble Fiber Hurts new
      #350010 - 09/16/09 01:53 PM
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Published 27 August 2009, doi:10.1136/bmj.b3154
Cite this as: BMJ 2009;339:b3154

Research
Soluble or insoluble fibre in irritable bowel syndrome in primary care? Randomised placebo controlled trial
C J Bijkerk, general practitioner1, N J de Wit, associate professor of general practice1, J W M Muris, associate professor of general practice2, P J Whorwell, professor of medicine and gastroenterology3, J A Knottnerus, professor of general practice2, A W Hoes, professor of clinical epidemiology and general practice1

1 Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, Netherlands, 2 Department of General Practice, Care and Public Health Research Institute (CAPHRI), Maastricht University, 6200 MD Maastricht, Netherlands, 3 Department of Medicine and Gastroenterology, University of Manchester, Manchester, M23 9LT


Objective To determine the effectiveness of increasing the dietary content of soluble fibre (psyllium) or insoluble fibre (bran) in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.
Design Randomised controlled trial.

Setting General practice.

Participants 275 patients aged 18-65 years with irritable bowel syndrome.

Interventions 12 weeks of treatment with 10 g psyllium (n=85), 10 g bran (n=97), or 10 g placebo (rice flour) (n=93).

Main outcome measures The primary end point was adequate symptom relief during at least two weeks in the previous month, analysed after one, two, and three months of treatment to assess both short term and sustained effectiveness. Secondary end points included irritable bowel syndrome symptom severity score, severity of abdominal pain, and irritable bowel syndrome quality of life scale.

Results The proportion of responders was significantly greater in the psyllium group than in the placebo group during the first month (57% v 35%; relative risk 1.60, 95% confidence interval 1.13 to 2.26) and the second month of treatment (59% v 41%; 1.44, 1.02 to 2.06). Bran was more effective than placebo during the third month of treatment only (57% v 32%; 1.70, 1.12 to 2.57), but this was not statistically significant in the worst case analysis (1.45, 0.97 to 2.16). After three months of treatment, symptom severity in the psyllium group was reduced by 90 points, compared with 49 points in the placebo group (P=0.03) and 58 points in the bran group (P=0.61 versus placebo). No differences were found with respect to quality of life. Fifty four (64%) of the patients allocated to psyllium, 54 (56%) in the bran group, and 56 (60%) in the placebo group completed the three month treatment period. Early dropout was most common in the bran group; the main reason was that the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome worsened.

Conclusions Psyllium offers benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in primary care.

Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00189033 [ClinicalTrials.gov] .


http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/339/aug27_2/b3154

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Dietary Fiber May Help Prevent Weight Gain & Obesity new
      #356362 - 03/05/10 12:16 PM
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January 6, 2010 Dietary fiber may help prevent gain in body weight and waist circumference, according to the results of a prospective cohort study reported online in the December 16, 2009, issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

"Dietary fiber may play a role in obesity prevention," write Huaidong Du, from the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in Bilthoven, the Netherlands, and colleagues. "Until now, the role that fiber from different sources plays in weight change had rarely been studied."

The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship of total dietary fiber, cereal fiber, and fruit and vegetable fiber with changes in weight and waist circumference. The study cohort consisted of 89,432 European participants, aged 20 to 78 years, without cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes at baseline. Validated, country-specific, food-frequency questionnaires were used to obtain dietary information. Average duration of follow-up was 6.5 years. In each center studied, multiple linear regression analysis was performed, and estimates were combined with random-effect meta-analyses, after adjustment for follow-up duration; other dietary variables; and baseline anthropometric, demographic, and lifestyle factors.

There was an inverse association of total fiber intake with subsequent change in weight and in waist circumference. For each 10-g/day increase in total fiber intake, the pooled estimate was 39 g/year (95% confidence interval [CI], 71 to 7 g/year) for weight change and 0.08 cm/year (95% CI, 0.11 to 0.05 cm/year) for waist circumference change.

For each 10-g/day increase in fiber intake from cereals, there was a weight change of 77 g/year (95% CI, 127 to 26 g/year) and change in waist circumference of 0.10 cm/year (95% CI, 0.18 to 0.02 cm/year). Fruit and vegetable fiber was not associated with weight change. However, the association of fruit and vegetable fiber intake with change in waist circumference was similar to that seen for intake of total dietary fiber and cereal fiber.

Limitations of this study include difference in methodologies used to collect anthropometric data at follow-up because weight and waist circumference measurements at follow-up were self-reported instead of measured at 4 of 6 study centers. In addition, dietary information was collected only once at baseline, which precluded investigating the concurrent association between changes in fiber intake and changes in weight and waist circumference.

"Our finding may support a beneficial role of higher intake of dietary fiber, especially cereal fiber, in prevention of body-weight and waist circumference gain," the study authors write. "Although the observed effect was rather small in our study when judged on the individual level, the effect of fiber on weight change observed in our study may be of public health relevance."

The DiOGenes (Diet, Obesity, and Genes) project, which was supported by the European Community, supported this study. The study authors have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Am J Clin Nutr. Published online December 16, 2009. Abstract

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/714651

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Strategy to combat cancer: Avoid meats and dairy products
      #356365 - 03/05/10 12:25 PM
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Strategy to combat cancer: Avoid meats and dairy products

Avoiding meats and dairy products is increasingly touted as helping to prevent the disease

Kimberly Hayes Taylor / The Detroit News

We've heard about ways to potentially prevent cancer and other diseases -- increase antioxidants, take vitamins, eat eight to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables daily and drink plenty of purified water.

We all know we're supposed to avoid salty and sugary foods, as well as foods loaded with fat and cholesterol -- and that we should exercise.

But what about the advice to avoid meat and meat by-products? After all, they are the only foods that contain cholesterol, and fruits and vegetables open the arteries while cholesterol-containing foods clog them.


Although some people find the idea of avoiding meat repulsive, a growing number of Metro Detroiters are embracing the idea so much they are taking classes to learn how to cook delicious yet simple meals without meat or dairy products such as milk, eggs, cheese, sour cream or yogurt.

They have good reason. A growing number of research studies on large groups of people indicate avoiding meat reduces the likelihood of battling cancer.

Last year, the National Cancer Institute released study results after examining 500,000 people for 10 years. The study concluded that eating large amounts of red and processed meats increased the likelihood of developing cancer. In the past few years, large studies in England and Germany showed that vegetarians were about 40 percent less likely to develop cancer compared to meat eaters. Additionally, Harvard studies showed that daily meat eaters have approximately three times the colon cancer risk, compared to those who rarely eat meat.

Vegetarianism also is suggested for cancer survivors.

When Mary Bobis of Farmington Hills was diagnosed with stage-four colon cancer in February 2007, her doctors recommended she stop eating meat, so she did. Now she's an expert at finding mouth-watering recipes that don't require any animal products.

"I've learned that 80 percent of cancer comes from the way we eat and the environment," says the 24-year-old. "And 20 percent is unexplained or genetic. I think because I was diagnosed at age 21, I fall into the latter group. I believe you can safely say most cancers are prevented by eating right and exercising."

It's not as difficult as you think to give up -- or greatly reduce -- meat intake, says James Tester, a Cancer Project educator who teaches a cancer-prevention cooking class Tuesday nights at Providence Park Hospital's Assarian Cancer Center in Novi. He says the key is learning the four new food groups -- fruit, vegetables, grains and beans.

"We promote changing all the way," he says. "It's a lifestyle change and you've got to go all the way. When you adapt this way of nutritious eating, you'll find an alternative for everything."

For example, Cheryl Heppard, a health coach based in Birmingham, advises clients who want to prevent cancer to switch from cow's milk to almond, coconut or rice milk. Soy products are abundant in grocery stores these days, but Heppard doesn't recommend them because of the bloating, gassiness and digestive problems they can cause.

Melinda Lewis, a certified health minister who teaches cooking classes at her Southfield home through Great Joy Health Ministries, suggests getting away from white processed sugar and trying natural sweeteners such as agave nectar and pure maple syrup.

Bobis, who was not expected to make it this long after a diagnosis more typical to people in their 60s, says changing the way she eats has sustained her.

"It changed my life," she says, "and makes me more aware of the causes of cancer and helps me feel better."

From The Detroit News: http://www.detnews.com/article/20100107/LIFESTYLE05/1070319/Strategy-to-combat-cancer--Avoid-meats-and-dairy-products#ixzz0hKsWFLJB

http://www.detnews.com/article/20100107/LIFESTYLE05/1070319/Strategy-to-combat-cancer--Avoid-meats-and-dairy-products

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Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She is the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

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