All Boards >> Irritable Bowel Syndrome Research Library

Posts     Flat       Threaded

Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | (show all)
Soy Cuts Risk of Endometrial Cancer new
      #92822 - 07/24/04 02:23 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA

SOYFOODS APPEAR TO CUT RISK OF ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

Regular intake of soyfoods is associated with a reduced risk of endometrial cancer, finds a large study of Chinese women published in tomorrow's British Medical Journal (vol 328, p1285). Thought to be one of the largest studies into the association between soy and endometrial cancer, the researchers from the Shanghai Cancer Institute and Vanderbilt University in the US report an inverse dose-response relation between intake of soya food and risk of the disease, which affects the lining of the womb.

They also found that the association was more pronounced among women with a higher body mass index or a higher waist:hip ratio. Endometrial cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women worldwide - around 7,090 American women will die of the disease in 2004 - but incidence
of the cancer varies more than 10-fold worldwide.

Given that Asian women have a lower incidence of endometrial cancer and eat more soya food than their Western counterparts, the authors hypothesized that dietary factors may play an important role in this international variation.

Soy isoflavones are thought to play a role in the development of hormone related cancers, including breast and endometrial cancer. These and other plant estrogens have been shown to alter circulating concentrations of ovarian steroid hormones, prolong the menstrual cycle and alleviate symptoms of menopause, although evidence is not
entirely consistent.

Researchers interviewed 832 women in Shanghai who were diagnosed with endometrial cancer between 1997 and 2001 and were between the ages of 30 and 69 years. A further 846 healthy women of the same age were randomly selected as a control group. Soya food intake over five years was measured and current body measurements were taken.

Women with the highest intake of soy protein were a third less likely to develop endometrial cancer than those with the lowest intake. Those with the highest isoflavone consumption had a 23 percent lower risk than the lowest intake group.

The researchers added: "The indication that women with a high body mass index or waist:hip ratio may benefit more from increased soya food intake needs to be verified in future studies," said the authors.

http://www.nowfoods.com?cat_id=2626

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She is the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Print     Remind Me     Notify Moderator    

Soybean protein reduces body fat and triglycerides in women new
      #96570 - 08/08/04 03:12 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA

Soybean protein reduces body fat in women

25/06/2004 - A Japanese study finds that soybean beta-conglycinin may help to maintain a healthy body fat ratio and serum lipid levels in healthy women.

Beta-conglycinin, a major soy storage protein, has previously been found to reduce triglyceride levels in obese mice and inhibit atherosclerosis in mice.
In the new study, researchers measured changes in body fat ratio and serum lipids after the ingestion of beta-conglycinin by 41 healthy women. The trend of change in body fat ratio following ingestion of the beta-conglycinin differed between students with a baseline body fat ratio over 25 per cent and those less than this amount.

In the former group the beta-conglycinin suppressed the increase in body fat ratio and in the six subjects who had a high total cholesterol level (e 5.72 mmol/L) there was a tendency towards reduced levels of serum triglyceride, free fatty acid, total cholesterol and lipoprotein although those levels did not change significantly.

The researchers concluded that if soybean beta-conglycinin is ingested continuously (5g daily), it will be effective in keeping body fat ratio and serum lipid levels normal and eliminating excessive lipids from the body.

This study was reported in the Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology 2004;50(1):26-31).

http://www.nutraingredients.com/news/news.asp?id=9521


--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She is the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Print     Remind Me     Notify Moderator    

Herbs are an Abundant Source of Antioxidants new
      #96572 - 08/08/04 03:17 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA

Oregano tops list of healthy herbs

Researchers from the US Department of Agriculture have found that herbs are an abundant source of antioxidants and could provide potential anticancer benefits when supplementing a balanced diet.

The research, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Chemical Society, showed that herbs have higher antioxidant activity than fruits, vegetables and some spices, including garlic.

"Some herbs should be considered as regular vegetables," said Shiow Y. Wang, Ph.D., the study's lead researcher and a biochemist with the USDA's Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, Md. "People should use more herbs for flavouring instead of salt and artificial chemicals."

Using various chemical tests, Wang studied and compared the antioxidant activity of 39 commonly used herbs grown in the same location and conditions. The study, which did not involve animal or human subjects, included 27 culinary and 12 medicinal herbs.

The herbs with the highest antioxidant activity belonged to the oregano family, the research showed. In general, oregano had three to 20 times higher antioxidant activity than the other herbs studied.

On a per gram fresh weight basis, oregano and other herbs ranked even higher in antioxidant activity than fruits and vegetables, which are known to be high in antioxidants. Oregano has 42 times more antioxidant activity than apples, 30 times more than potatoes, 12 times more than oranges and four times more than blueberries, Wang said.

Other herbs were also found to be high in antioxidants, including dill, garden thyme, rosemary and peppermint.

The most active phenol component in some of the herbs with the highest antioxidant activity, particularly oregano, was rosmarinic acid, a strong antioxidant.

Antioxidants are a class of compounds thought to prevent certain types of chemical damage caused by an excess of free radicals, charged molecules that are generated by a variety of sources including pesticides, smoking and exhaust fumes. Destroying free radicals may help fight cancer, heart disease and stroke, researchers believe.

Fruits and vegetables have long been viewed as a rich source of antioxidant compounds. Health officials have been urging consumers for years to eat more fruits and vegetables in order to gain the health benefits of antioxidants, but progress has been slow, according to researchers. Westerners still tend to favour diets that are rich in fats and carbohydrates, they say.

More recently, researchers have begun to formally study the health benefits of herbs and spices. The two differ mainly by source. Herbs typically come from the leaves of plants. Spices come from the bark, stem and seeds of plants. Both have been used for thousands of years to flavour foods and treat illness.

In general, fresh herbs and spices are healthier and contain higher antioxidant levels compared to their processed counterparts, according to Wang. For example, the antioxidant activity of fresh garlic is 1.5 times higher than dry garlic powder.

Just as consuming too much of any food product can carry health risks, herbs should be used with moderation, Wang cautioned. Herbs are no substitute for a balanced diet, she added, and pregnant women in particular should consult their physicians before taking herbal supplements.

http://www.nutraingredients.com/news/news.asp?id=3319



--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She is the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Print     Remind Me     Notify Moderator    

High-Fiber, Low-Fat Diet Helps Calcium Prevent Colon Cancer new
      #102637 - 08/30/04 01:18 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA

June 15, 2004 -- Calcium supplements could cut colon polyp risk -- especially advanced polyps that lead to colon cancer, new research suggests.

The report appears in the latest issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

"Our results suggest that calcium supplementation may have a more pronounced ... effect on advanced [colon polyps] than on other types of polyps," writes lead researcher Kristin Wallace, MS, with Dartmouth Medical School in Lebanon, N.H.

While some research has looked at this link, few have addressed it in any detail -- to look for the effects of calcium on different types of colon polyps, Wallace explains. These studies make no distinction on the effects of calcium supplements on polyp size or other characteristics.

Also, what are the effects of calcium in the diet and from pills? One study has suggested that a 700 mg supplement daily may prevent polyps. However, it's not been clear whether a high-calcium diet boosts or hinders that effect, she writes.

The researchers analyzed data from patients involved in the large Calcium Polyp Prevention Study. The analysis involved 913 patients whose average age was 61 and who were followed for at least four years.

They had been randomly assigned to take either 1,200 mg calcium supplements or a placebo. Each volunteer was asked about the calcium, fat, and fiber they typically got in their diet. Each participant had a history of having a polyp removed at least three years prior to the start of the study. They also had a colonoscopy at the beginning of the study to document no remaining polyps in the colon.

After four years:

The calcium group had 18% fewer noncancerous polyps and 35% fewer advanced polyps -- those with features that have a higher potential to become colorectal cancer -- compared with the placebo group.

There was another interesting pattern: Those with fewest polyps ate a high-calcium, high-fiber, low-fat diet. However, the numbers did not tally up as a definitive finding, notes Wallace.

In all, her study suggests that total calcium intake over 1,200 mg daily is necessary for colon protection -- and that a high-fiber diet with modest levels of fat will boost the protective effects, she writes.

Wallace's findings are in line with similar studies but fall short of proving a preventive link between calcium, colon polyps, and colon cancer, writes Arthur Schatzkin, PhD, with the National Cancer Institute, in an editorial.

However, studies are in place that could prove that this one nutritional factor -- calcium -- could offer protection against colon cancer. "That would be a tremendous advance," writes Schatzkin.

It's not clear how calcium acts to reduce colon polyps, writes Wallace. It may be that calcium binds "irritants" like bile acids and other fats in the bowel that are carcinogenic -- acting as a sort of "soap," possibly preventing colon cancer.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


SOURCES: Wallace, K. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, June 16, 2004; vol 96: pp 921-925. Schatzkin, A. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, June 16, 2004; vol 96: pp 893-894.

http://my.webmd.com/content/article/88/100106.htm

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She is the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Print     Remind Me     Notify Moderator    

Cranberry Juice Found to Help Prevent Peptic Ulcers new
      #108477 - 09/26/04 02:51 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA

Using cranberry juice for urinary tract infections has been known for a while, with recent studies showing a 20% decreased risk in urinary tract infections in women(1). The role for cranberry juice in helping promote health and prevent disease has now been broadened to include peptic ulcers. A new study in Food Nutrition and Science (2) found that a high-molecular-weight constituent in cranberry juice is able to prevent the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori from binding to the lining of the stomach.

H. pylori weakens the protective mucous coating of the stomach and duodenum, which allows acid to get through to the sensitive lining beneath. H. pylori is able to survive in stomach acid because it secretes enzymes that neutralize the acid. This mechanism allows H. pylori to make its way to the "safe" area of the protective mucous lining. The bacterium's spiral shape then allows it to burrow through the lining, causing a sore, or ulcer (3).

Peptic ulcers affect 25 million Americans at some point in their lives and are responsible for 1 million ulcer-related hospitalizations each year. H. Pylori has also been linked to stomach cancer, acid reflux disease, and gastritis (stomach inflammation).

References:

1. Kontiokari T. Randomised trial of cranberry-lingonberry juice and Lactobacillus GG drink for the prevention of urinary tract infections in women. British Medical Journal 2001;322: 1571-1573

2. Burger O. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori adhesion to human gastric mucus by a high-molecular-weight constituent of cranberry juice. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 2002; 42 (supplement): 279-284

3. MedLine Plus "H. Pylori and Peptic Ulcer"

Abstracted from "Is Cranberry Juice of Help to Peptic Ulcer Sufferers?" in Total Health Magazine, Volume 25 Number 3.

http://www.nowfoods.com/?action=itemdetail&item_id=19240

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She is the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Print     Remind Me     Notify Moderator    

Yogurt and gut function new
      #108483 - 09/26/04 03:06 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA


American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 80, No. 2, 245-256, August 2004

© 2004 American Society for Clinical Nutrition

Yogurt and gut function

Oskar Adolfsson, Simin Nikbin Meydani and Robert M Russell
1 From the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston


In recent years, numerous studies have been published on the health effects of yogurt and the bacterial cultures used in the production of yogurt. In the United States, these lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) include Lactobacillus and Streptococcus species. The benefits of yogurt and LAB on gastrointestinal health have been investigated in animal models and, occasionally, in human subjects. Some studies using yogurt, individual LAB species, or both showed promising health benefits for certain gastrointestinal conditions, including lactose intolerance, constipation, diarrheal diseases, colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, and allergies. Patients with any of these conditions could possibly benefit from the consumption of yogurt. The benefits of yogurt consumption to gastrointestinal function are most likely due to effects mediated through the gut microflora, bowel transit, and enhancement of gastrointestinal innate and adaptive immune responses. Although substantial evidence currently exists to support a beneficial effect of yogurt consumption on gastrointestinal health, there is inconsistency in reported results, which may be due to differences in the strains of LAB used, in routes of administration, or in investigational procedures or to the lack of objective definition of "gut health." Further well-designed, controlled human studies of adequate duration are needed to confirm or extend these findings.

http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/80/2/245


--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She is the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Print     Remind Me     Notify Moderator    

Nut Consumption and Decreased Risk of Gallbladder Removal in Women new
      #108485 - 09/26/04 03:12 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA

By Martha King, July 30, 2004, Abstracted from Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jul;80(1):76-81.

Nuts, which are high in fat, may be a food avoided by some, but a recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests an important health benefit from eating just 5 oz. of nuts per week.

Researchers followed the diets and health of more than 80,000 women over the period 1980 – 2000 by means of questionnaires mailed to them every 2 years. The authors of the study, from Harvard and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, were investigating whether including nuts in the diet is associated with reduced risk for gallbladder removal, a common surgical procedure.

The participants were women in the Nurses' Health Study, between ages 30 – 55 and had no previous history of gallbladder disease. They reported on their dietary intake of nuts (including peanuts, peanut butter and other nuts) and whether they had undergone surgery for gallbladder removal.

Dietary intake of nuts was measured by the number of servings eaten, with an ounce of nuts or one tablespoon of peanut butter counting as a serving. Dietary intake varied from less than a serving per month, to eating 5 or more servings per week amongst the women studied. Over the course of the study, there were 7831 cases of gallbladder removal surgery, also known as cholecystectomy.

After controlling for other risks of gallbladder disease, it was found that women who ate nuts 5 or more times per week had a 25 percent lower risk of cholecystectomy compared with women who ate nuts rarely or never. In addition, the study noted that women who consumed the most nuts, tended to weigh less, indicating that the energy contained in nuts tends to be balanced by reduced intakes of other calorie sources or by increased activity.

Nuts are rich in several compounds that may protect against gallstone disease. A good source of dietary fiber, (one ounce of peanuts or mixed nuts provides about 2.5 grams of fiber) nuts may protect against gallstone formation. Nuts are also a source of phytosterols, which may lower blood cholesterol. (An estimated 80% of gallstones are cholesterol stones). Nuts contain mono- and polyunsaturated fats as well, that have good effects on blood fat levels. In addition, nuts are a rich source of magnesium, which may also decrease the occurrence of gallstones.

http://www.icebase.com/reader.ice?CICB3142281457&will&883

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She is the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Print     Remind Me     Notify Moderator    

The Lowdown on Low Carbs new
      #112107 - 10/11/04 04:00 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA

The Lowdown on Low Carbs

In America recently, the new road to weight loss has been paved with high-protein, low-carb diets. In the past few years, an estimated 32 million carb-conscious Americans began taking cues from the well-known Atkins and South Beach diets, which forbid or severely limit eating bread, pasta, potatoes and other starches. These diets also blacklist refined flours, so out go the sugary sweets—cookies, donuts, cakes or candies. One effect of this anti-carb quest is that Americans now spend some $2.5 billion a year on low-carb products in hopes of shrinking their waistlines but keeping their food choices ample. As the food industry stocks hundreds of new, low "net" carb items onto supermarket shelves, some of the beleaguered heavy-carb industries—for instance orange and potato growers—have attempted to re-position their products as healthy "smart carbs."

But are low-carb diets really good for us?

Studies needed
Ironically, the study often credited with helping kick start the low-carb craze—published by Duke University in 20021—enrolled just 51 patients for a diet that lasted six-months. That's not a very long time for something that could potentially affect the rest of your life.

"Nobody knows the long-term effects, since it hasn't been carefully studied," says Eric J. Topol, M.D, chairman, Cleveland Clinic department of cardiovascular medicine. "It's all about total calories and good versus bad carbohydrates. So you're taking a risk if you, and your diet, don't take these points into account."

New studies, however, are being launched that will examine the low-carb diet's long-term effect on weight, arteries, cholesterol, body composition, bones and kidneys. But for now, the verdict is still out. There are, however, some things we do know.

"Long-term scientific evidence has proved that foods like fatty cuts of meat, cheese, cream, and butter—allowable foods on the Atkins diet—are all high in saturated fat and cholesterol," says Melissa Stevens Ohlson, M.S., R.D., L.D., nutrition program coordinator in preventive cardiology and rehabilitation. "These are the same foods associated with increases in blood cholesterol and risk for heart disease."

In addition, foods high in saturated fat have a direct impact on the flow of blood in arteries. Studies conducted on high-fat versus low-fat meals have shown that the arterial wall is narrowed after a high-fat meal, restricting the flow of blood. If you already have some narrowing of the arteries, this means further constriction of the arteries that could increase the risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

"Conversely, the foods that low-carbohydrate diets discourage are precisely the foods that have been shown to protect the body from heart disease—a variety of fruits, vegetables, legumes [dried beans, lentils, split peas] and unrefined whole grains," says Ohlson. These foods provide the body with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients that are essential to good health.

Ketones may be key
In high-protein diets, the body's normal fuel for energy—carbohydrates—are in severe short supply, so it compensates by burning fat. But this inefficient means of providing the body with an alternative source of energy also produces toxic byproducts known as ketones, in a process called ketosis. Some ketones leave the body via the lungs, while others must be excreted by the kidneys, a process that not only can overwork the organs, but also one that requires lots of water.

"Most of the weight loss in the first two weeks of a low-carb diet is from fluid loss," says Sethu Reddy, M.D., chairman, Cleveland Clinic department of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism. "This can cause problems like dehydration."

But along with the ketones, the kidney may also excrete beneficial electrolytes, such as calcium, magnesium and potassium. "During ketosis," says Dr. Reddy, "the kidneys excrete potassium, and the potassium level in the blood can drop to a dangerous level. This has the potential to lead to muscle fatigue and heart arrhythmias."

Other experts question whether the excess protein in low-carb diets might leach calcium from bones, weakening them. The salt and water depletion that occurs during ketosis may cause hypotension (low blood pressure), fatigue, fainting, constipation and kidney stones. Some experts fear ketosis may impair metabolism of insulin and liver function. And most important, the impact that ketosis may have on people who have diabetes, high cholesterol or high blood pressure has yet to be determined.

Finally, consider this: most dieters go off a diet at some point—that's human nature. And when the weight returns, they jump back on the dieting bandwagon, returning again and again to the "induction" or the extreme, limited-eating phase of the diet. "Repeated return to the induction phase makes for yo-yo dieting," says Dr. Reddy. "The body's metabolism shifts to become more efficient and conservative— leading to fat gain."

1. Westman EC, Yancy WS, Edman JS, Tomlin KF, Perkins CE. Effect of 6-month adherence to a very low carbohydrate diet program. Am J Med 2002;113(1):30-6.

Source: Cleveland Clinic Magazine 2004

http://www.clevelandclinic.org/ (site is in frames, so you have to do a site search for this specific article)

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She is the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Print     Remind Me     Notify Moderator    

Food Elimination Based on IgG Antibodies Helpful in Irritable Bowel Syndrome new
      #112116 - 10/11/04 04:24 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA

Food Elimination Based on IgG Antibodies Helpful in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

News Author: Laurie Barclay, MD

CME Author: Désirée Lie, MD, MSEd

Sept. 16, 2004 — In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), food elimination based on IgG antibodies reduced the symptom score by 26% in fully compliant patients, according to the results of a randomized, controlled trial study published in the October issue of Gut.

"Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) often feel they have some form of dietary intolerance and frequently try exclusion diets," write W. Atkinson, MD, from the University Hospital of South Manchester in the U.K., and colleagues. "Tests attempting to predict food sensitivity in IBS have been disappointing but none has utilised IgG antibodies."

The authors suggest that adverse reactions to food in patients with IBS might be caused by some form of immunologic mechanism other than dietary allergy, particularly one mediated by IgG antibodies.

In this study, 150 outpatients with IBS were randomized to receive, for three months, either a diet (the "true diet") excluding all foods to which they had IgG antibodies based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test or a "sham diet" excluding the same number of foods but not those to which they had antibodies. Primary outcome measures were change in IBS symptom severity and global rating scores, whereas secondary outcomes were noncolonic symptomatology, quality of life (QOL), and anxiety-depression. Analysis was based on intent-to-treat using a generalized linear model.

After 12 weeks, there was a 10% greater reduction in symptom score in the true diet group than in the sham diet group (mean difference, 39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5 to 72); P = .02). In fully compliant patients, reduction in symptom score was 26% (mean difference, 98; 95% CI, 52 to 144; P < .001).

As a whole, the true diet group also had significant improvements in global rating (P = .048; number needed-to-treat [NNT], 9). These improvements were even more pronounced in compliant patients (P = .006; NNT, 2.5). The NNT for each group is considerably better than the NNT of 17 achieved after three months of treatment with tegaserod, a drug that has been recently licensed for use in IBS.

The true diet group also fared better than did the sham diet group in all other outcomes. In the true diet group, relaxing the diet led to a 24% greater deterioration in symptoms (difference, 52; 95% CI, 18 to 88; P = .003).

"Food elimination based on IgG antibodies may be effective in reducing IBS symptoms and is worthy of further biomedical research," the authors write. "Many patients with IBS would prefer a dietary solution to their problem rather than having to take medication, and the economic benefits of this approach to health services are obvious. It is well known that patients expend large sums of money on a variety of unsubstantiated tests in a vain attempt to identify dietary intolerances."

Gut. 2004;53:1459-1464

Medscape Medical News 2004. © 2004 Medscape

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/489349

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She is the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Print     Remind Me     Notify Moderator    

Health-promoting compounds found in honey new
      #115462 - 10/24/04 07:17 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA

Health to drive honey choice for food formulations?

22/10/2004 - Health-promoting compounds found in honey could make this ingredient a more attractive option for food makers currently using bulk sweeteners such as high-fructose corn syrup and looking to jump on board the growing health foods trend, say scientists in the US.

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign say that honey may be a healthier alternative to corn syrup due to its higher level of antioxidants, compounds which are believed to fight cancer, heart disease and other diseases.
Honey, which contains a number of antioxidant components that act as preservatives, also shows promise as a replacement for some synthetic antioxidants widely used as preservatives in salad dressings and other foods, according to Nicki Engeseth, associate professor of food chemistry at the university.

High fructose syrups, known as isoglucose in Europe, kicked off in the US in the 1970s when the country developed new technologies to process this bulk calorific sweetener. The ingredient, an alternative to sucrose, rapidly gained in popularity and is now used extensively by soft drinks makers such as Coca-Cola and PepsiCo.

Honey, a natural syrup produced by bees is similar to invert sugar, with a small but variable excess of levulose (fructose). The composition and flavour of honey varies with the plant source of the nectar, processing and storage but a typical composition is 41 per cent fructose, 34 per cent glucose, 18 per cent water, and 2 per cent sucrose with a pH of 3.8 to 4.2.

According to the US researchers, dark-coloured honey, such as buckwheat honey, is generally thought to contain higher levels of antioxidants than the light-coloured varieties. Previous studies by the researchers, who presented their findings this week at the American Chemical Society meeting in Illinois, suggest that honey may have the same level of disease-fighting antioxidants as that of some common fruits.

Competition for European suppliers of honey ramped up recently when Brussels cleared the way to end a two-year ban on food imports from China, paving the way for cheaper raw materials for honey formulations.

Meeting at the Standing Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health in July member states cleared a Commission proposal to allow Chinese imports of honey, lifting a ban imposed on the product in 2002 after the antibiotic – chloramphenicol –was found to be present.

In international terms China is currently by far the largest honey producing nation in the world, with around a 40 per cent slice of the market. The next biggest producers are the US, Argentina and Ukraine.

According to the American Honey Producers Association, China and Argentina have been adversely affecting America's domestic honey industry with cheap imports, although there is a counter argument that both China and Argentina have been helping to counterbalance falling production in the US. Also starting to emerge onto the world honey production arena are Thailand and Vietnam.

http://www.nutraingredients.com/news/news-NG.asp?n=55557-health-to-drive

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She is the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Print     Remind Me     Notify Moderator    

Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | (show all)

Extra information
0 registered and 16 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  Heather 

Print Thread

Permissions
      You cannot post until you login
      You cannot reply until you login
      HTML is enabled
      UBBCode is enabled

Thread views: 531578

Jump to

| Privacy statement Help for IBS Home

*
UBB.threads™ 6.2


McAfee SECURE sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams

HelpForIBS.com BBB Business Review