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IBS may not affect small bowel transit time, but age does new
      #317292 - 10/24/07 01:56 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
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Dig Dis Sci. 2007 Oct;52(10):2884-7. Epub 2007 Apr 4.

Age and indication for referral to capsule endoscopy significantly affect small bowel transit times: the given database.

Fireman Z, Kopelman Y, Friedman S, Ephrath H, Choman E, Debby H, Eliakim R.

Department of Gastroenterology, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, P.O. Box 169, Hadera, 38100, Israel.

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of age and selected indications for capsule endoscopy on small bowel transit times. Data on 67 clinical studies (790 subjects with different gastrointestinal pathologies [49.5% males; mean age, 51.9 +/- 18.33 years; range, 18-91 years] and 87 healthy volunteers) were retrieved from the company (Given Imaging, Ltd.)-sponsored database. All subjects swallowed the PillCam SB Capsule after a 12-hr fast. The capsule reached the cecum in all 877 participants. Indications for referral for capsule endoscopy were as follows: 372 obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, 96 suspected Crohn's disease, 65 celiac disease, 54 irritable bowel syndrome, and 116 familial adenomatous polyposis, intestinal lymphoma, or ulcerative colitis. One group consisted of patients <40 years old (n = 235), and the other patients 40 years old (n = 555). The younger group, volunteers, and Crohn's disease patients had significantly shorter small bowel transit times than the others (P < 0.001). Gastric emptying indirectly influenced capsule transit time.

PMID: 17406814 [PubMed - in process]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=17406814&ordinalpos=51&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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Train operator suffering from irritable bowel syndrome sues for lost wages new
      #320203 - 12/06/07 02:45 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
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Train operator suffering from irritable bowel syndrome sues for lost wages

BY JOHN MARZULLI
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Tuesday, December 4th 2007

A subway operator's discriminationsuit gives new meaning to the No. 2 train.

When Rosetta Simmons was suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, she couldn't be far from a rest room when nature called - which was usually about four times a day.

Simmons, 60, had asked to be assigned to operate the Grand Central shuttle because, according to her calculations, a single run from one stop to the next takes 120 seconds and there is a rest room in the station 3 yards from the front of the train.

She insisted the frequent bowel movements, cramps and "a lot of gas" did not interfere with her job. Simmons simply notified the command center that she needed to take a "comfort break."

When the condition worsened, NYC Transit grounded Simmons.

Now she is appealing to a federal jury in Brooklyn to award her lost pay and monetary damages from when her career careened off the tracks: She was demoted to bus cleaner in 2001 and later canned because she couldn't do that job, either.

"They expected her to clean 60 buses in seven hours at a depot where the bathroom was a block-and-a-half away," her attorney, Gregory Antollino, said Monday in his opening statement.

That wasn't much of a reasonable accommodation because of the commute from Simmons' home in East Harlem to the bus depot on Staten Island, the lawyer pointed out.

"All she needed was assignment to the shuttle, which was near a bathroom," Antollino said.

Simmons sued for reinstatement and got her job back. The illness is in remission and she's back piloting the shuttle.

NYC Transit lawyer Steve Efron argued that no train operator is automatically dumped due to irritable bowel syndrome, but each case is assessed on the severity of the symptoms.

"These symptoms can interfere with concentration and alertness of a person in a safety sensitive position," he said.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2007/12/04/2007-12-04_train_operator_suffering_from_irritable_-1.html

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Patients with allergies appear to have a higher incidence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) new
      #323923 - 02/04/08 10:19 AM
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Atopy Implicated in Subgroup of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) Jan 23 - Patients with allergies appear to have a higher incidence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) than do those without allergies, suggesting that the conditions may be linked in some patients, Chicago-based researchers report.

Lead investigator Dr. Mary C. Tobin told Reuters Health that "the real hope of this study is that patients and physicians recognize the association between allergies and IBS."

To investigate a possible connection, Dr. Tobin and colleagues at Rush University Medical Center surveyed 125 consecutive patients: 39 were attending an allergy and immunology clinic, 36 were attending a gastroenterology clinic and the remaining 50 were attending a general medicine clinic.

The prevalence of IBS in patients attending the allergy clinic was 44%, similar to that of patients at the gastroenterology clinic (39%) and significantly greater than the 20% prevalence seen in general clinic attendees, the investigators report in the January issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

Overall, patients reporting atopic conditions including allergic rhinitis, allergic eczema and asthma were 3.20 times more likely than other patients to fulfill criteria for IBS.

Given these findings, the researchers suggest that patients who have typical IBS symptoms plus manifestations of atopy should be considered as a separate subgroup with atopic IBS.

Dr. Tobin added that "identifying the allergic triggers, both inhaled and ingested, as well as appropriate treatment of the allergies can markedly improve the patient's quality of life by controlling the symptoms."

Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2008;100:49-53.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/569115

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome's Possible Genetic Link new
      #323931 - 02/04/08 10:43 AM
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ScienceDaily (Dec. 11, 2003) Researchers at Mayo Clinic studying irritable bowel syndrome say their study of people with this disorder suggests genetic factors may play a role.

Irritable bowel syndrome is a common problem affecting about one in 10 adults. However, many people don't talk about irritable bowel syndrome, which causes abdominal cramping, constipation and diarrhea. The study, which is published in the December issue of Gut, an international journal in gastroenterology, shows that the risk of having irritable bowel syndrome is nearly double in the families of people with the disorder.

"The next challenge is determining nature versus nurture," said G. Richard Locke, M.D., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and one of the authors of the study. "Is this due to a gene or genes or is it due to a shared environmental factor? Our group is active in investigating these issues."

In developing the study, researchers noted that people with irritable bowel syndrome often report family members with similar symptoms. The researchers hypothesized that if there is a familial connection, there would be an increased frequency of irritable bowel syndrome in direct relatives of irritable bowel syndrome patients compared to relatives of people without irritable bowel syndrome.

Others who conducted the study include Jamshid Kalantar, M.D., Alan Zinsmeister, Ph.D., Christopher Beighley, and Nicholas Talley, M.D., Ph.D. Dr. Kalantar was a research fellow at Mayo Clinic during the study, but is now with the Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Australia. Mr. Beighley now works in West Virginia. The others are with Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

In the study, patients with irritable bowel syndrome seen at Mayo Clinic and their spouses filled out a bowel disease questionnaire and provided the names and addresses of their direct relatives. Researchers then sent a bowel disease questionnaire to 355 relatives of the patients and their spouses, and 71 percent responded. Irritable bowel syndrome occurred in 17 percent of the patients' relatives compared with 7 percent in spouses' relatives.

Adapted from materials provided by Mayo Clinic.

Need to cite this story in your essay, paper, or report? Use:

MLA Mayo Clinic (2003, December 11). Irritable Bowel Syndrome's Possible Genetic Link

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/12/031211080446.htm

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Psychological distress and GI symptoms are related to severity of bloating new
      #325738 - 02/28/08 02:40 PM
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Reged: 12/09/02
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Psychological distress and GI symptoms are related to severity of bloating in women with irritable bowel syndrome

Hyo Jung Park 1 *, Monica Jarrett 2, Kevin Cain, Margaret Heitkemper

1Division of Nursing Science, College of Health Science, Ewha Womans University, 11-1 Daehyun-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul 120-750, South Korea

2Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems, School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

3Department of Biostatistics and Office for Nursing Research, University of Washington, Seattle, WA


Funded by:
NINR
NIH; Grant Number: NR01094, P30-NR04001


Abstract
Bloating is a frequent complaint of women with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We compared retrospective and daily diary gastrointestinal and psychological distress symptoms in 183 women ages 18-48 in three IBS subgroups: Minimal-Bloating, Mild-Bloating, Moderate-Severe-Bloating.

More women with moderate to severe levels of bloating reported a history of hard stools, straining to have a stool, a history of depressive disorders, and more severe daily symptoms of depression and anxiety as compared to women with minimal or mild bloating symptoms.

Appraising the level of symptom severity and psychological distress is vital to the selection of appropriate treatment options.

2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Accepted: 24 July 2007
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1002/nur.20237

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/117881012/ABSTRACT?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0

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Abdominal Bloating and Distension in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders new
      #325753 - 02/28/08 03:16 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
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Review Article: Abdominal Bloating and Distension in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders -- Epidemiology and Exploration of Possible Mechanisms

Posted 01/22/2008

A. Agrawal; P. J. Whorwell

Author Information

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Summary and Introduction
Summary
Background: A sensation of abdominal bloating, sometimes accompanied by an increase in girth (distension), is one of the most common and most intrusive features of functional bowel disorders.
Aim: To conduct a systematic, evidence-based review of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of abdominal bloating and its relationship to distension.
Methods: The terms bloating, distension, functional bowel, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation and diarrhoea were searched on MEDLINE up to 2006. References from selected articles and relevant abstracts were also included.
Results: Approximately 50% of irritable bowel syndrome patients with bloating also experience an increase in abdominal girth and this is more pronounced with constipation than diarrhoea. Bloating appears to be more frequently associated with visceral hypersensitivity, whereas distension is more often related to hyposensitivity and delayed transit. Although there is little evidence for excessive gas as a cause of bloating, gas infusion studies suggest that handling of gas may be impaired in irritable bowel syndrome and there may also be abnormal relaxation of the anterior abdominal musculature in these patients.
Conclusions: There is unlikely to be a single cause for bloating and distension, which probably have different, but overlapping, pathophysiological mechanisms. Relieving constipation might help distension, but the treatment of bloating may need more complex approaches involving sensory modulation.

Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008;27(1):2-10. 2008 Blackwell Publishing


http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/568555_1

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IBS is keeping me hostage! new
      #326582 - 03/14/08 11:12 AM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA

Int J Nurs Pract. 2008 Apr;14(2):135-48.

'I feel as if my IBS is keeping me hostage!' Exploring the negative impact of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) upon university-aged women.

Schneider MA, Fletcher PC.

Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, Ontario, Canada.

The purpose of this article is to describe the negative impact of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and/or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) upon university-aged women. This exploratory study was conducted using phenomenology, with heuristic inquiry as the guiding theoretical orientation. Seven women participated in an email interview and in a semistructured interview. The findings indicate that women with active IBD/IBS commonly experience an anxiety reaction, followed by an attack of illness. This attack then triggers a cascade of impact that negatively influences their emotional and physical well-being, ultimately affecting their overall quality of life. Health-care professionals can play an important role in minimizing the impact of IBD/IBS upon those affected, and possible interventions are suggested.

PMID: 18315827 [PubMed - in process]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18315827?ordinalpos=10&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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Abdominal Bloating in Employed Adults: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Association With Other Bowel Disorders new
      #328676 - 04/22/08 02:07 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
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1: Am J Gastroenterol. 2008 Apr 16

Abdominal Bloating in Employed Adults: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Association With Other Bowel Disorders.

Tuteja AK, Talley NJ, Joos SK, Tolman KG, Hickam DH.
George E. Wahlen V.A. Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

BACKGROUND Bloating is common, but its significance as a marker of underlying disease has not been defined. AND AIMS: We report on risk factors for bloating, its relationship to physical activity and quality of life (QOL), and its predictive value for functional bowel disorders.

METHODS: This is a cross-sectional population-based study of 1,069 employees of the Veterans Affairs Black Hills Health Care System. The validated Bowel Disease Questionnaire was used to identify subjects with abdominal bloating and other bowel disorders. The association of bloating with QOL was assessed using the SF36 (Short-Form 36) questionnaire. Physical activity was assessed using the modified Baecke questionnaire.

RESULTS: The response rate was 72% (723 of 1,069). Bloating was reported by 21% of all subjects (95% confidence interval [CI] 17.7-23.7), 64% with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 35% with non-IBS constipation, 23% with non-IBS diarrhea, and 42% with dyspepsia. Functional bloating (i.e., bloating in the absence of other bowel disorders) was reported by 7% of subjects (95% CI 5.2-9.0). Of those with bloating, 28% had IBS, 25% non-IBS constipation, 8% non-IBS diarrhea, and 30% dyspepsia. The positive and negative predictive values of bloating in the diagnosis of functional bowel disorder were 66% and 87%, respectively. The only risk factors were smoking and high-dose aspirin. Bloating was not associated with physical activity. QOL on all subscales of SF36 was lower in subjects with bloating than those without bloating.

CONCLUSIONS: Bloating is a common symptom in otherwise healthy adults, and is often associated with but not predictive of functional bowel disorders. Smoking and high-dose aspirin are associated with bloating while physical activity is not.

PMID: 18422817 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18422817?ordinalpos=5&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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Gallstones, cholecystectomy and irritable bowel syndrome
      #328681 - 04/22/08 04:01 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
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Dig Liver Dis. 2008 Apr 9

Gallstones, cholecystectomy and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) MICOL population-based study.

Corazziari E, Attili AF, Angeletti C, De Santis A.
Department of Clinical Science, University "Sapienza", Rome, Italy.

BACKGROUND: Subjects with irritable bowel syndrome may undergo an excess of cholecystectomy. It is not known, however, whether the cholecystectomy rate parallels an increased risk of gallstones.

AIM: Aim was to assess the prevalence and the incidence of gallstones and cholecystectomy in subjects with irritable bowel syndrome symptoms.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In this population-based study, 29,139 subjects (63.2% of 46,139 randomly selected subjects, age 30-69 years) underwent a physical examination, an interview on gastrointestinal symptoms and an upper abdominal ultrasonography. An identical survey was carried out 7.8+/-1.0 (M+/-S.D.) years later on 8460 gallstone-free subjects at the first survey. Prevalence and incidence of gallstones and cholecystectomy were assessed in subjects with (1) irritable bowel syndrome; (2) abdominal pain and normal bowel; (3) altered bowel and no abdominal pain and (4) asymptomatic controls; univariate and multivariate regression logistic models were used for statistical analysis.

RESULTS: Prevalence odds of gallstones and cholecystectomy were significantly higher in irritable bowel syndrome and abdominal pain and normal bowel than in controls. Irritable bowel syndrome and abdominal pain and normal bowel subjects were more aware of gallstones than controls (p<0.001), and the prevalence of gallstones in irritable bowel syndrome subjects unaware of their gallbladder status was not significantly different from the controls. The incidence of gallstone disease in irritable bowel syndrome, abdominal pain and normal bowel, and altered bowel and no abdominal pain subjects did not differ from the controls. The incidence of cholecystectomy was higher in irritable bowel syndrome and abdominal pain and normal bowel groups than in controls and altered bowel and no abdominal pain group.

CONCLUSIONS: Irritable bowel syndrome subjects have an increased risk of cholecystectomy that is not due to an increased risk of gallstones, but rather to abdominal pain, awareness of having gallstones, and inappropriate surgical indications.

PMID: 18406218 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18406218?ordinalpos=18&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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Irritable bowel syndrome: an international study of symptoms in eight countries
      #334190 - 08/07/08 12:42 PM
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7795
Loc: Seattle, WA

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008 Jul;20(7):659-67.

Irritable bowel syndrome: an international study of symptoms in eight countries.

Gerson CD, Gerson MJ, Awad RA, Chowdhury A, Dancey C, Poitras P, Porcelli P, Sperber A, Wang WA.
Division of Gastroenterology, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York University, New York, USA. cgerson@yahoo.com

OBJECTIVES: This report is a preliminary comparative study of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in eight countries, USA, Mexico, Canada, England, Italy, Israel, India, and China. We also assessed global symptom patterns and correlations and relationships to several psychosocial variables. METHODS: Two hundred and thirty-nine participants completed a bowel symptom scale composed of four symptoms, abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, diarrhea, and constipation as well as two psychosocial questionnaires, quality of relationship and attribution of symptoms to physical or emotional factors. RESULTS: Pain score in Italy, with the least urban population, was significantly higher than six of the seven other countries whereas it was lowest in India and England. Bloating was highest in Italy and constipation was highest in Mexico, both significantly higher than five other countries. Diarrhea was higher in China than five other countries. All significance values were P<0.05. Globally, diarrhea was less common than constipation, P<0.001 and bloating significantly correlated with constipation as well with pain, P<0.05. Composite analysis of psychosocial variables and symptoms indicated that family conflict correlated directly, P<0.05, whereas family support correlated indirectly, P<0.01, with pain and bloating. Pain, bloating and diarrhea were significantly attributed to physical etiology, P<0.01, whereas only diarrhea was attributed to emotional cause, P<0.05. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that there are significant variations in irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in different geographic locations around the world. Various hypotheses that may explain our data such as cultural beliefs, gut contamination, urban and rural location, dietary practice, and psychosocial factors should be further investigated.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18679069?ordinalpos=6&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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