Help For Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) - Education, Support, & Self Help for Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Heather & Company View Cart
Shop for IBSIBS Message BoardsIBS News & ReviewsStore Finder
Home
IBS Diet & Recipes
IBS Books
IBS Supplements
Yoga for IBS
Hypnosis for IBS
Tummy Teas
Get The IBS Diet Cheat Sheet
Get Trigger Foods, Safe Foods, Ten Commandments of Eating for IBS, More!

Enter First Name:

Enter Email:

We value your privacy


All Boards >> Irritable Bowel Syndrome Research Library

Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | (show all)
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7668
Loc: Seattle, WA
Brain Imaging Illustrates How Meditation Reduces Pain new
      #364374 - 04/20/11 03:16 PM

Demystifying Meditation: Brain Imaging Illustrates How Meditation Reduces Pain

ScienceDaily (Apr. 11, 2011) — Meditation produces powerful pain-relieving effects in the brain, according to new research published in the April 6 edition of the Journal of Neuroscience.

"This is the first study to show that only a little over an hour of meditation training can dramatically reduce both the experience of pain and pain-related brain activation," said Fadel Zeidan, Ph.D., lead author of the study and post-doctoral research fellow at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

"We found a big effect -- about a 40 percent reduction in pain intensity and a 57 percent reduction in pain unpleasantness. Meditation produced a greater reduction in pain than even morphine or other pain-relieving drugs, which typically reduce pain ratings by about 25 percent."

For the study, 15 healthy volunteers who had never meditated attended four, 20-minute classes to learn a meditation technique known as focused attention. Focused attention is a form of mindfulness meditation where people are taught to attend to the breath and let go of distracting thoughts and emotions.

Both before and after meditation training, study participants' brain activity was examined using a special type of imaging -- arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) -- that captures longer duration brain processes, such as meditation, better than a standard MRI scan of brain function. During these scans, a pain-inducing heat device was placed on the participants' right legs. This device heated a small area of their skin to 120° Fahrenheit, a temperature that most people find painful, over a 5-minute period.

The scans taken after meditation training showed that every participant's pain ratings were reduced, with decreases ranging from 11 to 93 percent, Zeidan said.

At the same time, meditation significantly reduced brain activity in the primary somatosensory cortex, an area that is crucially involved in creating the feeling of where and how intense a painful stimulus is. The scans taken before meditation training showed activity in this area was very high. However, when participants were meditating during the scans, activity in this important pain-processing region could not be detected.

The research also showed that meditation increased brain activity in areas including the anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula and the orbito-frontal cortex. "These areas all shape how the brain builds an experience of pain from nerve signals that are coming in from the body," said Robert C. Coghill, Ph.D., senior author of the study and associate professor of neurobiology and anatomy at Wake Forest Baptist.

"Consistent with this function, the more that these areas were activated by meditation the more that pain was reduced. One of the reasons that meditation may have been so effective in blocking pain was that it did not work at just one place in the brain, but instead reduced pain at multiple levels of processing."

Zeidan and colleagues believe that meditation has great potential for clinical use because so little training was required to produce such dramatic pain-relieving effects. "This study shows that meditation produces real effects in the brain and can provide an effective way for people to substantially reduce their pain without medications," Zeidan said.

Funding for the study was provided by the Mind and Life Institute in Boulder, Colo., and the Center for Biomolecular Imaging at Wake Forest Baptist.

Story Source:

The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.

Journal Reference:

1. F. Zeidan, K. T. Martucci, R. A. Kraft, N. S. Gordon, J. G. McHaffie, R. C. Coghill. Brain Mechanisms Supporting the Modulation of Pain by Mindfulness Meditation. Journal of Neuroscience, 2011; 31 (14): 5540 DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5791-10.2011


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110405174835.htm

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7668
Loc: Seattle, WA
Hypnosis as IBS health care quietly gains ground new
      #365862 - 08/22/11 12:59 PM

Hypnosis as health care quietly gains ground

The last decade has produced a number of studies suggesting benefits

By Rachael Rettner
updated 8/21/2011 1:32:16 PM ET


In 1987, Marilyn Bellezzo was diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a disorder that was, for her, debilitating.

"I was housebound," Bellezzo said. She spent hours curled up on the bathroom floor, suffering from abdominal pain and diarrhea. "I had to raise my children through the bathroom door," said the now 59-year-old resident of Glen Ellyn, Ill.

Over the next 12 years, Bellezzo tried medications and diets, to no avail. Then as a last resort, she started listening to audio tapes designed to treat IBS through hypnosis.

They made a difference. Now, she says her symptoms are virtually gone.

"I went from that level of severity to just having an occasional episodes lasting a few minutes," Bellezzo said.

Over the last decade, more and more research shows there are benefits of hypnosis for medical problems. In addition to IBS, a number of rigorous studies have found the practice is effective at mollifying chronic pain and reducing stress and anxiety before surgery. Studies have also shown hypnosis reduces health care costs — patients who use it stay in the hospital for shorter periods and use less medication.

So why don't more people and hospitals use hypnosis? Part of the reason may be its stigma — patients and doctors may think of it more as "hocus pocus" than science. Another reason may be problems with the quality of hypnosis studies, leading doctors to be wary that it wastes time and money.

All of these are misperceptions, its advocates say.

"Hypnosis is sort of the good kid with the bad reputation," said Julie Schnur a clinical psychologist and assistant professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. "It’s a fantastic procedure and can be very effective and very helpful to patients, but does come with this baggage," Schnur said.

Hypnosis myths

The concept of hypnosis might call to mind an entertainer lulling an audience member with a shiny pendulum, and then getting them bark like a dog.

But in medicine, hypnosis means putting a patient in an enhanced state of relaxationduring which the patient is more open to suggestions, said Harold Pass, an associate professor of clinical psychiatry at Stony Brook University Medical Center in New York. The patient is not asleep, nor unconscious, and does not lose control over his or her actions, Pass said.

"People do not turn into a zombie, they will not quack like a duck, there are no swinging pocket watches," Schnur said. "It's using your mind and your thoughts to help yourself feel better."

During a session, the patient is first brought into a trancelike state of highly focused attention. Some say people move into and out of this state every day, said Mark Jensen, vice chair for research in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Washington Medical Center, and liken it to being completely absorbed, as in watching a sunset.

"It doesn’t feel foreign or strange at all," said Bellezzo, who now works for the hypnotherapist who treated her. "It basically feels like that period of time right before you fall asleep." You're still aware of everything, but your attention is very focused, she said.

In this state, brain changes occur that make people better able to alter their perceptions, Jensen said. For example, a hypnotherapist may ask a patient to change the location, intensity or quality of their perception of pain, Jensen said, for example, imagining a burning sensation instead feels like water.

Hypnosis has its risks. Although rare, reactions such as headaches, nausea and anxiety happen to some people, according to the Mayo Clinic. And the use of hypnosis in patients with certain mental illnesses, or to help any patient relive earlier life events remains controversial because these uses might create false memories.

How well does it work?

Hypnosis is not magic — it alleviates symptoms, but doesn’t cure disease. And for chronic pain suffers, it rarely eliminates their pain, Jensen said.


And although not everyone can be hypnotized, studies show 70 to 80 percent of chronic pain patients experience pain relief that lasts for hours, Jensen said.

Michael Clark, director of the Pain Treatment Program at John Hopkins University, said there isn't overwhelming evidence that hypnosis is effective for chronic pain, but there is evidence nonetheless. Clark has recommended the therapy to patients who are open to it.

"A lot of the alternative therapies like hypnosis, meditation, acupuncture, Tai Chi — those types of therapies or approaches, they really don’t have any serious risk associated with them," Clark said. "They may not have a huge evidence base, but the risk-benefit equation is favorable."

According to a 2008 review article in the journal Nature, "there is an emerging body of evidence that hypnotherapy is clinically effective for the treatment of IBS." Several well-designed studies have shown long-term benefits for patients, including reductions of abdominal pain, anxiety and depression, the researchers said.

In 2007, Schnur and colleagues conducted a study of 200 breast cancer patientswho needed surgery. About half underwent a 15-minute hypnosis session before their surgery; the other half talked with a psychologist about their thoughts and feelings pre-surgery.

Patients who underwent hypnosis required less sedative during the surgery, and because they were more relaxed, their surgeries lasted10 fewer minutes on average. They experienced less pain, nausea, fatigue and emotional upset following the surgery, Schnur said. The researchers calculated the hospital could save about $770 per cancer patient by employing hypnosis before surgery.

Why isn't it used more?

Patients and doctors may have misperceptions about hypnosis. They may think it's flaky and not realize it is supported by scientific evidence, Schnur said. Doctors may be unfamiliar with hypnosis because it's not taught in medical school and they may not read about it in journals, said Janet Konefal, assistant dean for complementary and integrative medicine at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Doctors and hospital administrators may have misunderstandings about how much hypnosis will cost, who can administer it and how long it will take, Schnur said. But sessions can take as little as 15 minutes, and anyone licensed to perform medical services could be trained to provide hypnosis, she said.

Still, hypnosis for some conditions, such as IBS, may take longer, and the limited number of trained clinicians may restrict the number of patients who can try it, according to the 2008 Nature paper.

And studies have shown mixed results. For example, a 2009 Cochrane reviewfound that while hypnosis seemed to be helpful in treating IBS, research on its effectiveness suffered from poor design and small sample sizes, so results should be interpreted with caution.

The Mount Sinai group is considering alternative ways to deliver hypnosis, such as over the Internet (perhaps through a video chat) or though a cellphone application.


Bellezzo said she also uses hypnosis to treat her chronic pain.

"Whenever I get that [pain], I play one of the sessions," Bellezzo said. "Within 15 minutes, I'm pain-free. It's absolutely amazing."

Pass it on: Mounting evidence seems to show that hypnosis helps patients, but the practice still faces a stigma and suffers from lack of high-quality research showing its benefits.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44206689/ns/health-health_care/#.TlK0Xl1MBTA





--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7668
Loc: Seattle, WA
Effects of Gut-Directed Hypnotherapy on IBS new
      #366305 - 10/21/11 12:53 PM

Am J Gastroenterol.
2011 Oct 4.
doi: 10.1038/ajg.2011.340.

Effects of Gut-Directed Hypnotherapy on IBS in Different Clinical Settings-Results From Two Randomized, Controlled Trials.

Lindfors P, Unge P, Arvidsson P, Nyhlin H, Björnsson E, Abrahamsson H, Simrén M.

Source

1] Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden [2] Department of Internal Medicine, Gävle County Hospital, Gävle, Sweden [3] Department of Gastroenterology, Sabbatsbergs Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract
OBJECTIVES:

Gut-directed hypnotherapy has been found to be effective in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, randomized, controlled studies are rare and few have been performed outside highly specialized research centers.

The objective of this study was to study the effect of gut-directed hypnotherapy in IBS in different clinical settings outside the traditional research units.

METHODS:

The study population included IBS patients refractory to standard management. In study 1, patients were randomized to receive gut-directed hypnotherapy (12 sessions, 1 h/week) in psychology private practices or supportive therapy, whereas patients were randomized to receive gut-directed hypnotherapy in a small county hospital or to serve as waiting list controls in study 2. Gastrointestinal symptom severity and quality of life were evaluated at baseline, at 3 months follow-up and after 1 year.

RESULTS:

We randomized 138 IBS patients refractory to standard management, 90 in study 1 and 48 in study 2. In both the studies, IBS-related symptoms were improved at 3 months in the gut-directed hypnotherapy groups (P<0.05), but not in the control groups (ns). In study 1, a significantly greater improvement of IBS-related symptom severity could be detected in the gut-directed hypnotherapy group than in the control group (P<0.05), and a trend in the same direction was seen in study 2 (P=0.17). The results seen at 3 months were sustained up to 1 year.

CONCLUSIONS:

Gut-directed hypnotherapy is an effective treatment alternative for patients with refractory IBS, but the effectiveness is lower when the therapy is given outside the highly specialized research centers.

Am J Gastroenterol advance online publication, 4 October 2011; doi:10.1038/ajg.2011.340.

PMID:
21971535
[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21971535

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7668
Loc: Seattle, WA
Hypnosis effective in treating irritable bowels new
      #367205 - 04/06/12 11:14 AM

Hypnosis effective in treating irritable bowels
Published: Tuesday, Apr 3, 2012, 16:07 IST
Place: Stockholm | Agency: IANS

Hypnosis can be highly effective in treating the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), characterised by abdominal pain, abdominal distension and bloating.

Studies based on 346 patients conducted by The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden, showed that hypnotherapy alleviated symptoms in 40% of those affected — and that the improvement was long-term.

Researcher Magnus Simrén and colleagues at The Sahlgrenska Academy have conducted two studies to evaluate a form of treatment that could be used in ordinary healthcare, according to a Sahlgrenska statement.

In one of the studies, published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, 138 patients with IBS received hypnotherapy treatment for one hour a week over 12 weeks. The study showed that 40% registered a satisfactory lowering of symptoms, compared with 12% in the untreated control group.

"The treatment involves the patient learning to control their symptoms through deep relaxation and individually adapted hypnotic suggestions. The idea is for the patient to then use this technique in their everyday life," says Simrén.

The positive effect was sustained for the entire year for which the study ran and led to an improvement in the quality of life experienced by the treatment group.

In the other study, presented in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 208 patients who had previously received hypnotherapy were examined.

The results showed that 85% of those who had been helped by hypnosis still felt the benefits of the treatment up to seven years later - and that the majority still actively use the technique in their everyday lives.

"In this group, use of the healthcare system as a result of stomach and bowel symptoms had also reduced by 70%," says Simrén.

http://www.dnaindia.com/health/report_hypnosis-effective-in-treating-irritable-bowels_1671003

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7668
Loc: Seattle, WA
Gut-directed group hypnotherapy improved quality of life in patients with IBS new
      #369349 - 03/18/13 01:22 PM

Gut-directed group hypnotherapy improved quality of life in patients with IBS

Moser G. Am J Gastroenterol. 2013;doi:10.1038/ajg.2013.19.

March 4, 2013

Patients with refractory irritable bowel syndrome indicated better illness-related quality of life after undergoing gut-directed group hypnotherapy in addition to medical treatment in a recent study.

Researchers randomly assigned 100 adult patients with refractory IBS to receive either supportive talks with medical treatment (SMT, controls) or to undergo 10 weekly 45-minute sessions of gut-directed group hypnotherapy (GHT) within 12 weeks, in addition to SMT. Patients’ quality of life was measured via the 26-item IBS impact scale (IBS-IS) before and after intervention, and after 12 months of follow-up. General quality of life, psychological status and changes to individual IBS symptoms also were assessed.

Intervention was performed in 46 GHT cases and 44 controls. More than half (60.8%) of the GHT group experienced improved quality of life compared with 40.9% of SMT controls (P=.046). During 12 months of follow-up, 54.3% of the GHT group had sustained improvement compared with 25% of the SMT group (P=.004).

Severe IBS, as indicated by IBS-IS scores of 4 or lower, was observed in 76.1% of GHT patients and 75% of the SMT group at baseline. After 5 weeks, 71.7% of GHT patients scored greater than 4 (indicating mild-to-moderate IBS) compared with 40% of the SMT group. Changes to IBS-IS were statistically significant over time only for GHT recipients (P=.007). Binary regression analysis incorporating age, sex or IBS type and duration indicated that only GHT intervention was predictive of improvement within the treatment period (OR=2.5, 95% CI, 1.1-5.8).

Both groups experienced reductions in abdominal pain, flatulence and constipation. GHT patients indicated significantly better quality of life via Short Form (36) Health Survey (P=.006) and better physical well being (P=.023), psychological well being (P=.046) and life satisfaction (P=.049) upon treatment completion compared with SMT.

“GHT is highly effective, even in treatment-refractory IBS, and is superior to SMT alone,” the researchers concluded. “Given that IBS drug developments have been disappointing, GHT is a useful and harmless therapy option with no side effects. It can be learned and provided by specialized physicians, psychologists and psychotherapists, and can be made available for more patients with severe and/or refractory IBS in specialized centers.”


http://www.healio.com/gastroenterology/irritable-bowel-syndrome/news/online/%7B0B569E45-BF17-4981-834A-DE4A01620C0D%7D/Gut-directed-group-hypnotherapy-improved-quality-of-life-in-patients-with-IBS

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7668
Loc: Seattle, WA
MP's support for pioneering IBS work by Michael Mahoney new
      #369448 - 04/18/13 05:42 PM

A WARRINGTON based clinical hypnotherapist has received the backing of his local MP on his groundbreaking work, which could help save the NHS money.

During a meeting with Warrington South MP David Mowat, internationally acclaimed hypnotherapist Michael Mahoney highlighted the problems caused by a common gastrointestinal disorder that can affect up to 1 in 5 of the population at some time in life.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome or IBS is a gastrointestinal condition, which can cause diarrhoea, pain, bloating, nausea, constipation and a number of other associate symptoms. Medical research is divided as to why IBS develops and to date there is no definitive cure. Medications, supplements and diets may provide only short term relief, but for many, symptoms can continue after many treatment options have failed.

The on-going physical symptoms often result in the emotional issues of anxiety, travel concerns, frustration, decreased confidence and self-esteem to name a few. Because the symptoms can be so resistant to treatment, IBS places a large burden upon the nation's health service.

IBS affects both adults and children, with sufferers visiting their GPs more frequently. Referrals to hospital gastroenterology departments are made where expensive tests are carried out to exclude more serious conditions that can mimic IBS symptoms. The IBS diagnosis is one of exclusion and is usually made when nothing abnormal can be found.
IBS can result in increased absenteeism from work or school, bringing higher costs to employers, students miss college and later, university classes and younger children miss school, sabotaging their education. And after a year or so of ineffective treatment, the medical investigations may start again, and so the expensive cycle continues.
IBS is not classified as a serious condition that can result in death, but medical experts agree that the Quality of life (QoL) of an IBS sufferer is restricted to varying degrees, dependent upon the frequency and presentation of the IBS symptoms.

However it has been well researched that clinical hypnotherapy can significantly decrease the symptoms and frequency of IBS.

Michael has been helping IBS sufferers to live a normal life since 1991 when he saw his first IBS sufferers in the Warrington area. He has achieved this through his original gut-specific protocol, which manages and even eliminates the IBS condition completely for over 90% of his patient population. Most of his IBS sufferers were severe cases, having had IBS for many years with nothing else addressing the condition until they completed Mahoney's protocol.

Mahoney is now based at Woolston Surgery, Woolston Neighbourhood Hub, Warrington WA1 4PN.

During his meeting with Mr Mowat Michael explained the benefits of using hypnotherapy for the IBS condition. In fact hypnotherapy is one of the talking therapies recommended in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines after 12 months of non-effective pharmacological treatment.
He also explained the high costs of IBS on the NHS and business, and the benefits of hypnotherapy, and how this effective method worked generally, but more specifically with the IBS condition.

Michael said, "The meeting was very valuable. Mr. Mowat very quickly understood the frustrations of this forgotten patient population, and was very positive in his encouragement of my work. Far from being hurried, I was listened to, important questions were asked and answered, and I felt Mr. Mowat understood the gravity of this often trivialised condition. I am delighted that my work, and its benefits for IBS sufferers everywhere, has taken a positive step forward today."

Mr Mowat said: "Michael's work is a fine example of what can be done with persistence and a dedication to those who suffer, while finding a possible innovative solution to NHS budget costs. It is encouraging to find dedication like this within my constituency."

Michael has researched the IBS condition and developed specific hypnotherapy processes which are used in his successful IBS Audio Program 100 for adults. This recorded audio program is now helping IBS sufferers in over 45 countries. Michael was invited to Buckingham Palace garden party in 2011 as a result of his 'innovative health solutions' referring to his home use audio recordings, of which IBS is one.

Michael developed the first IBS training workshops for hypnotherapists in the country, and runs an IBS clinic in Warrington. He is co- owner and principal of Cambridge College of Hypnotherapy, and Cheshire College of Hypnotherapy, providing diploma training to those wanting to join the hypnotherapy profession.

Listen to samples of Michael Mahoney's program for IBS, and learn more here http://www.helpforibs.com/shop/books/hypnoibs.asp


Article source: http://www.warrington-worldwide.co.uk/articles/15534/1/MPs-support-for-pioneering-IBS-work/Page1.html

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7668
Loc: Seattle, WA
Gut-directed hypnotherapy improves remission for Ulcerative Colitis new
      #370163 - 09/11/13 11:24 AM

Gut-directed hypnotherapy improved remission maintenance for UC

Keefer L. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013;38:761-771.

September 5, 2013

Patients with ulcerative colitis in remission were more likely to maintain remission if they underwent gut-directed hypnotherapy in a recent study.

Researchers randomly assigned 54 adult patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) in remission at enrollment to seven weekly, 40-minute sessions of gut-directed hypnotherapy (HYP; n=26) or attention control (n=28). All participants self-reported more than one flare per year, had documented flares within the previous 1.5 years and were receiving a stable dose of maintenance therapy for more than 1 month before the study.

Disease status and quality of life were measured at baseline and at 2, 20, 36 and 52 weeks after completing therapy. Patients provided sociodemographic and medical information, completed daily symptom diaries at baseline and during treatment, and responded to questionnaires assessing disease activity, physical and mental health and perceived stress levels.

Laurie Keefer, PhD

Laurie Keefer

“As a health psychologist, I would see patients who would loosen up on their self-care when they were in remission, and it seemed like having a pleasant, simple tool like hypnotherapy could help keep them in touch with their disease self-management,” researcher Laurie Keefer, PhD, associate professor and director of the Center for Psychological Research in GI at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, told Healio.com.

Flares occurred in eight patients in the HYP group and 15 among controls. HYP patients had a greater number of days to clinical relapse than controls on one-way Anova analysis (F=4.8, P=.03). More treated patients maintained remission for 1 year (68% vs. 40% of controls; P=.04) in chi-square analysis. Investigators calculated via Cox proportional hazards model that controls were at 2.11 times the risk for flares compared with HYP recipients (P=.09).

Quality of life and assessments of psychological factors, stress levels and medication adherence did not differ significantly between groups.

“Hypnotherapy works as an adjunct treatment in inflammatory bowel disease,” Keefer said. “It may help keep patients in remission a little longer, especially those patients who have frequent flares or who have functional symptoms on top of their IBD.”

Listen to a Gut-Directed Hypnotherapy Program Here


http://www.healio.com/gastroenterology/inflammatory-bowel-disease/news/online/%7B69f548bb-c2e2-42d5-80ab-52d6a05aadf4%7D/gut-directed-hypnotherapy-improved-remission-maintenance-for-uc

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7668
Loc: Seattle, WA
Is tummy trouble keeping your child out of school? It could be Irritable Bowel Syndrome. new
      #370289 - 09/25/13 12:56 PM

Is tummy trouble keeping your child out of school? It could be Irritable Bowel Syndrome

By Sandra Walsh

PUBLISHED: 19:03 EST, 23 September 2013 | UPDATED: 03:10 EST, 24 September 2013


Debilitating: It's suggested that 20% of children suffer from IBS symptoms

The common cold regularly tops the list of reasons for school absence - no surprise there. But the second most cited cause is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

One mother who knows only too well how debilitating the condition can be is Claire McKee. Her son Elliott first developed symptoms when he started full-time at school at the age of four.

'He started getting bad tummy aches,' recalls Claire. 'Every night he would be clutching his tummy and crying in agony. I would try to cuddle him to sleep.

'In the mornings Elliott would spend ages in the loo, suffering frequent bouts of diarrhoea. It was awful watching him in pain and not being able to do anything.

'He'd be terrified he wouldn't be able to get to the loo in time at school or that his classmates would notice the smell.'

Claire's GP ordered blood tests to rule out serious digestive disorders such as coeliac and Crohn's disease. These came back clear. Elliott was then referred to a dietician, who suggested eliminating various foods to see if the problem was a food allergy or intolerance. Again the results were negative.

It was only after talking to a friend, a long-term sufferer of irritable bowel syndrome, that Claire put two and two together.

'It was a lightbulb moment,' says Claire, from Billingshurst, West Sussex. 'Elliott's symptoms matched my friend's almost exactly.'


The symptoms of IBS are triggered when muscles in the large intestine become sensitised and contract. The underlying cause is unknown, but stress can be a trigger.

'I realised Elliott's problems had coincided with him starting full-time at school,' says Claire. 'He didn't get on with his new teacher and that's when it began.

'Yet when we'd gone to Portugal in the school holidays, the symptoms disappeared.

'It was a relief to realise that Elliott didn't have some horrible illness, but a shock to find out there was no cure.'

While as many as one adult in three will suffer from IBS at some point, many don't realise children can also be affected. Indeed, one study suggested that 20 per cent of children suffer from IBS symptoms. The peak ages are from four to 12.

So how can parents tell if their child has a simple tummy ache or IBS?
Surprising: The second most cited cause for school absence is IBS

Surprising: The second most cited cause for school absence is IBS

'Most children will have bowel upsets and tummy aches when they're having a stressful time but it usually goes away,' says Professor Nick Read, a gastroenterologist and adviser to the IBS Network.

'To be diagnosed with IBS requires symptoms going on for a month or two.'

Children should first be screened for coeliac and Crohn's. 'Once these have been ruled out, IBS is the usual diagnosis,' he says. 'Children don't suddenly get IBS at 15; they've probably always had it but it was put down to “toddler diarrhoea” or tummy troubles.

'The problem is that IBS is simply a name for a collection of symptoms that have no medical cause.'

One theory is that because IBS tends to be more common in the West, our diets, high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread, cakes and pasta, may play a part.

There are certain predisposing factors, adds Dr Aminda De Silva, a gastroenterologist at the Royal Berkshire hospital. 'Gastrointestinal infections are one, dietary sensitivities another, but the key thing is stress.'

Although there is no cure, there is plenty you can do to help, says Professor Read. 'The doctor must try to understand the child and find out the cause of the stress. This might mean working with the parents.'

For adults, guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) suggest hypnotherapy or counselling, and while they don't specifically refer to children under 18, 'there's good evidence that these are helpful', he adds. 'The key is getting teenagers to understand what's happening in their lives to make the symptoms happen.'
Precautions: If you suspect your child might have IBS, have them screened first for coeliac and Crohn's

Precautions: If you suspect your child might have IBS, have them screened first for coeliac and Crohn's

Children with IBS often dread going to school and live in fear of their friends finding out, says Michael Mahoney, a hypnotherapist with 25 years' experience who specialises in IBS and works with children in the North-West via GP referral.

'One main fear is that they won't be able to get to the loo in time, and that can make them fearful of leaving the house at all.

'It's usually safe to say that the symptoms are learned responses and perhaps began as a result of previous gastro-intestinal upset, but lingered on.'

Mr Mahoney adds: 'Sometimes the symptoms could also be a subconscious way for the child to obtain focus on themselves. Parents of younger children, especially, may actually contribute to symptoms continuing.

'I try to teach children that every thought has a physical response, and that they can learn to get rid of negative thoughts to reduce anxiety and IBS symptoms.'

Children with IBS are often advised to change their diet as some foods can trigger an attack, perhaps because they are harder to digest. They should also avoid caffeine, found in some fizzy drinks, which elevates the stress hormone cortisol.

Dr Peter Irving, a gastroenterologist at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital and The London Clinic, has had promising results with a diet devised in Australia. The 'Low Fodmap' diet restricts foods containing poorly absorbed sugars called FODMAPs.

'It works on the principle that not all sugars can be absorbed within the small intestine,' says Dr Irving.

'As a result, they are rapidly fermented by bacteria in the bowel which draws in fluid and produces gas.

'This can cause symptoms including bloating, abdominal pain and diarrhoea.'

Foods containing FODMAPs include honey, apples, pears, stone fruit such as peaches, onions, garlic, cabbage, beans and sweeteners such as sorbitol.

Research at King's College Hospital found that 75 per cent of those on the diet saw their symptoms improve.

Elliott, now 12, has learnt to manage his symptoms through trial and error. Certain foods, such as apples, seem to make matters worse, so he avoids these. 'He's doing well,' says Claire.




Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2430193/Irritable-Bowel-Syndrome-cause-childs-tummy-trouble.html#ixzz2fw5eKZQP



Michael Mahoney's hypnotherapy program for children with IBS

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7668
Loc: Seattle, WA
Relaxation intervention improves symptoms, may help treat IBS, IBD new
      #372220 - 07/16/15 04:41 PM

Relaxation intervention improves symptoms, may help treat IBS, IBD

Kuo B, et al. PLOS ONE. 2015;doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0123861.

Participation in a relaxation response based mind-body group intervention was associated with improvements in disease-specific measures, trait anxiety and pain catastrophizing in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease, according to study findings.

The quality of life in patients with IBS and IBD is often significantly affected and influenced by stress and resiliency associated with these conditions.

Braden Kuo, MD, of the gastrointestinal unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, and colleagues sought to assess the impact of a 9-week relaxation-response based mind-body group intervention in patients with IBS (n = 19) and IBD (n = 29). The intervention focused on relaxation-response and the building of cognitive skills. They assessed symptom questionnaires and inflammatory markers before and after the intervention, and again at short-term follow-up.

Braden Kuo

Results indicated significant improvements in Pain Catastrophizing Scale scores post-intervention for IBD and at short-term follow-up for both IBS and IBD (from 10.7 at baseline to 5.0 at week-13, P = .02 for IBS; and from 14.8 to 9.6, P < .01 for IBD).

In addition, significant improvements were observed in Trait Anxiety scores from baseline to week-10 (from 39.0 to 33.7, P = .02 for IBS; and from 39.3 to 33.6, P < .01 for IBD). IBS-QOL scores increased from a mean of 67.1 at baseline to 74.8 at week-10 (P = .01) and to 80.6 at week-13 (P < .001); IBS Symptom Severity Index scores significantly decreased from a mean of 215 at baseline to 154 at week-5 (P < .01), 128 at week-10 (P < .001) and 147 at week-13 (P = .01); and IBD Questionnaire scores increased from a mean of 171 at baseline to 185 at week-10 (P < .01) and sustained at 184 at week-13 (P = .02).

Compared with 1,059 genes altered with the intervention among those with IBD, 119 genes were altered in those with IBS. Reduced expression of intervention response genes was significantly associated with inflammatory response, cell growth, proliferation and oxidative stress-related pathways in those with IBD. Significant upregulation of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage related gene sets were observed after the intervention in those with IBS.

Top focus molecules identified in IBS were TNF, AKT and NF-&#954;B; whereas inflammation (VEGF-C, NF-&#954;B) and cell cycle and proliferation (UBC, APP) associated genes emerged as top focus molecules in IBD, according to the researchers.

“Observed gene expression changes suggest that NF-&#954;B is a target focus molecule in both IBS and IBD — and that its regulation may contribute to counteracting the harmful effects of stress in both diseases. Larger, controlled studies are needed to confirm this preliminary finding,” Kuo and colleagues wrote.

Disclosure: The study was supported by a grant from the CDC and the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Diseases. The researchers report being a consultant for, receiving funding from and serving on the boards of Basis, Civitas Therapeutics, Furiex, Genova Diagnostics, Given Imaging, Lantheus Medical Imaging, Onyx Pharmaceuticals and Shire Human Genetic Therapies.

http://www.healio.com/gastroenterology/inflammatory-bowel-disease/news/online/%7B5cdf2f0b-7add-4e72-93d9-11218ce85f50%7D/relaxation-intervention-improves-symptoms-may-help-treat-ibs-ibd?utm_source=maestro&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=gastroenterology%20news

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7668
Loc: Seattle, WA
At-Home Cognitive Therapy Relieves IBS Symptoms new
      #373646 - 01/19/18 01:56 PM


Coverage from the

World Congress of Gastroenterology 2017

News > Conference News
At-Home Cognitive Therapy Relieves IBS Symptoms

Damian McNamara

January 15, 2018

ORLANDO — A self-administered protocol for cognitive behavioral therapy that requires minimal clinician contact can be just as effective at relieving the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) as traditional therapy delivered in a clinical setting, new research shows.

With this protocol, "for the most part, symptom improvement is sustained out to 3 months and 6 months," said investigator Jeffrey Lackner, PsyD, from the University of Buffalo School of Medicine in New York.

These findings — which received an American College of Gastroenterology Governors Award for Excellence in Clinical Research — suggest that home-based treatments could be used to relieve chronic constipation, diarrhea, bloating, gas, and other IBS symptoms in more patients without increasing clinician time or the use of healthcare resources.

In April 2017, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom updated its guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of IBS in adults. Patients who continue to experience IBS symptoms despite at least 12 months of pharmacologic treatment should be referred for cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnotherapy, or psychological therapy, the guidelines state.
HCP Site - Relapsing MS Medication Info
View Information On An Oral Treatment For Relapsing MS. Sign Up For Updates.

"The problem is that only a small fraction of people receive cognitive therapy in accordance with practice guidelines," said Dr Lackner. Therefore, "there is a demand for treatments that maintain efficacy but are more efficient to implement."

"One strategy is to decrease therapist contact time using home-based treatments," he said here at the World Congress of Gastroenterology.

For their study, Dr Lackner and his colleagues randomized 438 adults with moderate to severe IBS, diagnosed using Rome III criteria, to four 1-hour sessions of self-administered therapy, 10 sessions of standard psychiatrist- or psychologist-led therapy, or four sessions of education only. They assessed symptom relief at 12 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months.
A Durable Response

Significantly more patients in the self-administered therapy group than in the education-only group responded to the intervention — defined as moderate or substantial improvement — at 12 weeks (67.8% vs. 46.2%; P < .05) and at 3 months (63.8% vs. 49.2%; P < .05). At 6 months, the difference did not meet the threshold for significance (63.2% vs 50.5%; P < .07).

Patients' self-reported improvements closely mirrored the global assessments of gastroenterologists blinded to group assignment. At 12 weeks, the clinicians identified as responders 63% of the patients in the self-administered therapy group and 43% of the education-only group. They also identified 60% of patients in the standard therapy group as responders.

"Cognitive behavior therapy appears to have an enduring effect that protects against relapse and recurrence in a sizable sample," Dr Lackner reported.

Continue reading...

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/891321

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | (show all)


Extra information
0 registered and 7 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  Heather 

Print Thread

Permissions
      You cannot post until you login
      You cannot reply until you login
      HTML is enabled
      UBBCode is enabled

Thread views: 258567

 
Jump to

| Privacy statement Help for IBS Home

*
UBB.threads™ 6.2

LEGAL DISCLAIMER - This website is not intended to replace the services of a physician, nor does it constitute a doctor-patient relationship. Information on this web site is provided for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosing or treating a medical or health condition. If you have or suspect you have an urgent medical problem, promptly contact your professional healthcare provider.

Any application of the recommendations in this website is at the reader's discretion. Heather Van Vorous, HelpForIBS.com, and Heather & Company for IBS, LLC are not liable for any direct or indirect claim, loss or damage resulting from use of this website and/or any web site(s) linked to/from it. Readers should consult their own physicians concerning the recommendations on these message boards.



Home | Shop for IBS | IBS Message Boards | IBS News & Reviews
IBS Diet & Recipes | IBS Books | IBS Supplements | Yoga for IBS | Hypnosis for IBS
IBS Tummy Teas | Irritable Bowel Syndrome Glossary

About Us | IBS Links | Search this Site | Site Map | Shipping & Returns | Privacy & Security
Contact Us | For Doctors & Dietitians | Wholesale | Co-packing Services

1999-2009, Heather Van Vorous, HelpForIBS.com, Heather & Company for IBS, LLC.
All information & art is proprietary and may not be duplicated.
All rights reserved.

Legal & Medical Disclaimer

Website Design