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HeatherAdministrator

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Mind/Body psychological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome new
      #326574 - 03/14/08 10:31 AM

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2008 Mar;5(1):41-50.

Mind/Body psychological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.

Naliboff BD, Fresé MP, Rapgay L.

UCLA Center for Neurovisceral Sciences and Women's Health, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Currently, the goal of treatment for those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is to improve the quality of life through a reduction in symptoms. While the majority of treatment approaches involve the use of traditional medicine, more and more patients seek out a non-drug approach to managing their symptoms. Current forms of non-drug psychologic or mind/body treatment for IBS include hypnotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy and brief psychodynamic psychotherapy, all of which have been proven efficacious in clinical trials. We propose that incorporating the constructs of mindfulness and acceptance into a mind/body psychologic treatment of IBS may be of added benefit due to the focus on changing awareness and acceptance of one's own state which is a strong component of traditional and Eastern healing philosophies.

PMID: 18317547 [PubMed - in process]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18317547?ordinalpos=9&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
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Irritable Bowel Syndrome Audio Program Celebrates 10 Years of Success new
      #329537 - 05/08/08 11:05 AM

Called by some "the best kept secret in Gastroenterology" the IBS Audio Program 100 developed by Michael Mahoney, Clinical Hypnotherapist at Guardian Medical Centre in Cheshire England is now used by Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) sufferers in 41 countries.

From the early days of 1998 when the IBS Audio Program 100 was first released it was impossible to foresee the impact that this home use audio program would have on the lives of so many people around the world.

IBS is a common digestive condition which affects up to 1 in 5 of the population of the UK and USA, with varying degrees of severity in most other countries. It impacts the individual resulting in lost working days, increased costs to employers and health care providers and insurance companies.

While medical science has no known cure for the condition, or a reason of why the condition begins in the first place, it has been widely recognised for more than 20 years in the medical world that hypnotherapy can be an effective treatment option to reduced frequency and severity of presenting symptoms. Hypnotherapy has recently been listed as a treatment option for IBS in the UK's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines.

The IBS Audio Program 100 was developed specifically for the IBS condition, to manage both the physical and the emotional aspects of IBS, which are commonly reported by IBS sufferers.

IBS can cause chronic and sever physical symptoms such as pain,wind constipation diarrhoea,nausea, urgency for the toilet, alternating bowel habit, and spasm along with other symptoms. The IBS Audio Program 100 also addresses the often neglected emotional aspects of IBS, including loss of confidence and self esteem, weepiness, reduced memory and concentration and more.

Coupled with an effective listening schedule and progress log the program brings real hope and understanding to the IBS sufferer. It also comes complete with an informational CD 'The IBS Companion' for those living with the IBS suffer, but who do not have the IBS condition themselves, this has also proved useful to co-workers and other family members to understand the IBS condition for fully.

Michael Mahoney the author and developer of the program is delighted. "The IBS Audio Program 100 has and is making positive differences to the majority of its users. While there is no such thing as a magic wand, many users have suggested it maybe the next best thing." The problem is, said Mahoney, "IBS sufferers go through the health-care system, and are often told there is nothing else that can be done for them, and they will have to live with it. Many have found the IBS Audio Program 100 through word of mouth, and through desperation, and as a last resort."

For comprehensive information about the program check here http://www.helpforibs.com/hypnosis/selfhyp1.asp


http://www.prweb.com/releases/2008/04/prweb857164.htm

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HeatherAdministrator

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Gastroenterologists are calling for hypnotherapy to be used more widely in treating IBS new
      #332583 - 07/16/08 01:36 PM

Leading gastroenterologists are calling for hypnotherapy to be used more widely in treating irritable bowel syndrome. Images such a fast-flowing river in the gut slowing down and soothing the bowel may be able to significantly improve IBS symptoms, say researchers at King's College London. In one study at Withington Hospital, 12 weeks of hypnotherapy helped 71 per cent of patients ease their IBS symptoms for five years after the treatment.

What to do: Sitting quietly, imagine your whole body becoming softer and heavier, limb by limb. Visualise a soothing river flowing through your gut. Imagine the river flow first at the "current speed" of your bowel, then slow it down to the "imagined" speed needed for symptoms to cease.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-wellbeing/features/how-to-think-yourself-better-861879.html

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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
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Hypnotherapy for IBS new
      #336558 - 09/26/08 03:06 PM

1: J Psychosom Res. 2008 Jun;64(6):621-3.

Hypnotherapy for irritable bowel syndrome: the response of colonic and noncolonic symptoms.

Whorwell PJ.


University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.

There is now good evidence that hypnotherapy benefits a substantial proportion of patients with irritable bowel syndrome and that improvement is maintained for many years. Most patients seen in secondary care with this condition also suffer from a wide range of noncolonic symptoms such as backache and lethargy, as well as a number of musculoskeletal, urological, and gynaecological problems. These features do not typically respond well to conventional medical treatment approaches, but fortunately, their intensity is often reduced by hypnosis.

The mechanisms by which hypnosis mediates its benefit are not entirely clear, but there is evidence that, in addition to its psychological effects, it can modulate gastrointestinal physiology, alter the central processing of noxious stimuli, and even influence immune function.

PMID: 18501263 [PubMed - in process]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18501263?ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
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Using art to help understand the imagery of irritable bowel syndrome and its response to hypnotherapy new
      #342893 - 03/05/09 02:52 PM

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2009 Apr;57(2):162-73.

Using art to help understand the imagery of irritable bowel syndrome and its response to hypnotherapy.

Carruthers HR, Miller V, Morris J, Evans R, Tarrier N, Whorwell PJ.

University of Manchester, United Kingdom.

A medical artist asked 109 patients if they had an image of their IBS pre- and posthypnotherapy, making precise watercolor paintings of any images described.

Results were related to treatment outcome, symptoms, anxiety, depression, and absorption (hypnotizability); 49% of patients had an image, and a wide variety were recorded and painted. Imagery was significantly associated with gender (p < .05), anxiety (p < .05), noncolonic symptomatology (p < .05), and absorption (p = .001); 57.8% of responders compared with 35.5% of nonresponders to hypnotherapy had an image of their disease (p < .05) before treatment, and color images were associated with better outcomes (p = .05) than monochrome ones.

All images changed in responders, often becoming more nonspecific in nature.

Inquiring about IBS imagery helps to identify potential responders and nonresponders to hypnotherapy and may also provide insights into how patients think about their illness.

PMID: 19234964 [PubMed - in process]


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19234964?ordinalpos=13&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7679
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Hypnotherapy relieves more than just IBS symptoms new
      #346476 - 05/28/09 01:31 PM

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2009 Jul;57(3):279-92.

Hypnotherapy for functional gastrointestinal disorders: a review.

Miller V, Whorwell PJ.

University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and noncardiac chest pain, can suffer from a range of severe symptoms that often substantially erode quality of life.

Unfortunately, these conditions are notoriously difficult to treat, with many patients failing to improve despite being prescribed a wide variety of conventional medications. As a consequence, the potential benefits of hypnotherapy have been explored with evidence that this approach not only relieves symptoms but also appears to restore many of the putative psychological and physiological abnormalities associated with these conditions toward normal.

These observations suggest that this form of treatment has considerable potential in aiding the management of functional gastrointestinal disorders and should be integrated into the ongoing medical care that these patients are receiving.

PMID: 19459089 [PubMed - in process]


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19459089?ordinalpos=10&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7679
Loc: Seattle, WA
Hypnotherapy for IBS - systematic review of patients shows long-lasting symptom relief new
      #352659 - 11/24/09 01:09 PM

Z Gastroenterol. 2009 Nov;47(11):1153-9. Epub 2009 Nov 6.


Hypnotherapy for irritable bowel syndrome--a systematic review


[Article in German]

Hefner J, Rilk A, Herbert BM, Zipfel S, Enck P, Martens U.

Abteilung Innere Medizin VI, Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie, Universität Tübingen.


The Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional disorder with a remarkable clinical and economic impact. Several pathogenetic factors of IBS are discussed and summarised within a bio-psycho-social model. Data from published hypnotherapeutic interventions with approximately 800 patients show long-lasting symptom relief.

The underlying mechanisms of action are not well understood. Nine mechanism studies show influences of hypnosis on colorectal sensitivity, colorectal motility and mental strain (anxiety, depression, maladaptive cognitions). Results are often contradictory and effects of hypnosis on several of the proposed pathogenetic factors are not examined at all.

This paper reviews previous studies on hypnotherapy in IBS patients with a focus on symptom relief and mechanisms of action.

PMID: 19899024 [PubMed - in process]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19899024?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=11

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HeatherAdministrator

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Rapid Response to Cognitive Behavior Therapy Predicts Treatment Outcome in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome new
      #356600 - 03/11/10 01:55 PM

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Feb 17.

Rapid Response to Cognitive Behavior Therapy Predicts Treatment Outcome in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Lackner JM, Gudleski GD, Keefer L, Krasner SS, Powell C, Katz LA.

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York.

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an empirically validated treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), yet it is unclear for whom and under what circumstances it is most effective. We investigated whether patients who achieved a positive response soon after CBT onset (by week 4), termed rapid responders (RRs), maintain treatment gains compared with non-rapid responders. We also characterized the psychosocial profile of RRs on clinically relevant variables (eg, health status, IBS symptom severity, distress).

METHODS: The study included 71 individuals (age, 18-70 y) whose IBS symptoms were consistent with Rome II criteria and were of at least moderate severity. Patients were assigned randomly to undergo a wait list control; 10 weekly 1-hour sessions of CBT; or four 1-hour CBT sessions over 10 weeks. RRs were classified as patients who reported adequate relief of pain, adequate relief of bowel symptoms, and a decrease in total IBS severity scores of 50 or greater by week 4.

RESULTS: Of patients undergoing CBT, 30% were RRs; 90% to 95% of the RRs maintained gains at the immediate and 3-month follow-up examinations. Although the RRs reported more severe IBS symptoms at baseline, they achieved more substantial, sustained IBS symptom reduction than non-rapid responders. Both dosages of CBT had comparable rates of RR.

CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of IBS patients treated with CBT have a positive response within 4 weeks of treatment; these patients are more likely to maintain treatment gains than patients without a rapid response. A rapid response is not contingent on the amount of face-to-face contact with a clinician.

Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20170751 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20170751

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HeatherAdministrator

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Loc: Seattle, WA
Even The Most Severe Symptoms Rapidly Relieved By Self-Directed Behavioral IBS Treatment new
      #358596 - 05/13/10 10:47 AM

Even The Most Severe Symptoms Rapidly Relieved By Self-Directed Behavioral IBS Treatment

Article Date: 13 May 2010 - 5:00 PDT

Nearly one-third of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who underwent a novel behavior treatment developed by a University at Buffalo behavioral scientist achieved significant relief within four weeks of beginning treatment.

These patients, called "rapid responders" maintained their improvement at a three-month follow-up, despite reporting more severe IBS symptoms when they started the treatment.

Results also showed that the amount of "face time" spent with a therapist during the 10-week treatment regimen didn't have an effect on rapid response.

The study is published in the current issue of the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

"These results are important, because conventional wisdom states that benefit from behavioral treatments is tied to the amount of treatment patients receive," says first author Jeffrey Lackner, PsyD, associate professor in the Department of Medicine, UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, and director of its Behavioral Medicine Clinic.

"In some patients this assumption does not prove to be true," he continues. "Regardless of whether patients received two or four sessions of behavioral treatment, a significant proportion rapidly achieved significant relief of severe IBS symptoms and maintained these gains for at least three months."

Irritable bowel syndrome is a chronic, debilitating disorder affecting 25 million people in the U.S. - 14-24 percent of women and 5-19 percent of men. In the past, there had been no reliable, satisfactory medical treatment for the full range of IBS symptoms, which can cause severe physical and psychological distress and deprive sufferers of their quality of life.

Lackner is principal investigator on an $8.9 million, seven-year, multi-site clinical trial funded by the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) to test the treatment, which proved effective during his pilot study. The UB trial is the largest IBS clinical trial conducted to date, and one of the largest behavioral trials without a drug component funded by the NIH.

The current study involved 71 participants from its UB site who were randomized to receive either four one-hour sessions with a behavioral therapist over 10 weeks, 10 one-hour sessions over 10 weeks or to a "wait" group, which served as a control.

Researchers were interested in knowing if patients who showed significant improvement soon after beginning treatment maintained that improvement at three months after the 10-week intervention, and if so, how these rapid responders were different from the non-rapid responders.

Lackner says they found a strong connection between participants' beliefs about their IBS symptoms and their rapid response and maintenance of improvement.

"Rapid responders were more likely to attribute their symptoms to their own specific behavior, express more confidence in their ability to make specific behavior changes necessary to control IBS symptoms and have stronger motivation to participate in a self-management program," says Lackner.

"One might assume that the therapist-directed, time-intensive and highly structured weekly cognitive behavior therapy would be more likely to promote a more rapid response. That turned out not to be the case."

In addition, 92.5 percent of rapid responders showed an enduring benefit that lasted well over three months with little evidence of deterioration.

"This suggests that rapid response is a relatively robust, clinically meaningful and enduring clinical phenomenon," says Lackner. "The enduring nature of the response to treatment argues against the idea that the results are due to placebo."

He continues: "The study has implications for designing clinical trials that test the effectiveness of medical therapies. Generally speaking, the approach has been to test two treatments side by side. This horse race approach is useful, but may not provide information about the more pressing question of: which treatment works best for which patient?

"Our study suggests that what goes on during treatment may be more important to understanding the course of outcome than factors such as the severity of their illness, age, gender and education level. Generally speaking, these variables are not reliable predictors of outcome."

Additional authors on the paper from UB are Gregory D. Gudleski, PhD, Susan S. Krasner, PhD, Catherine D. Powell and Leonard A. Katz, MD, and Laurie Keefer, PhD, from Northwestern University.

Source:
Lois Baker
University at Buffalo

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/188623.php

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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7679
Loc: Seattle, WA
IBS Patient's Response To Hypnotherapy Can Be Predicted By Color Test new
      #362417 - 12/09/10 11:10 AM

In IBS, A Patient's Response To Hypnotherapy Can Be Predicted By Color Test

Article Date: 08 Dec 2010 - 1:00 PST

When people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were asked to relate their mood to a color, those choosing a positive color were nine times more likely to respond to hypnotherapy than those who chose a negative color or no color at all. Researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine suggest that these findings could be used to predict responders to treatment.

Peter Whorwell worked with a team of researchers from the University of Manchester, UK, to carry out the study using a color chart called the 'Manchester Color Wheel' which allows patients to choose colors that have previously been defined as positive, neutral or negative. He said, "Our unit has been providing hypnotherapy for the treatment of IBS for over twenty years with approximately two thirds of patients responding to treatment. Unfortunately, patients may require as many as twelve one hour sessions of therapy to secure a response and therefore this results in the treatment being relatively expensive to provide. Consequently it would be very useful to be able to predict responders".

Speaking about the results Whorwell said, "Being able to describe mood in terms of a positive color is a sign of an active imagination, which is an important component of hypnotic ability". The hypnotherapy provided in Professor Whorwell's Unit is called gut-focused hypnotherapy. The technique aims to give a patient control over their gut and they have shown that following a course of treatment actual changes in gastrointestinal function can be demonstrated.

Notes:
Mood color choice helps to predict response to hypnotherapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome Helen R Carruthers, Julie Morris, Nicholas Tarrier and Peter J Whorwell BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (in press)

Source:
Graeme Baldwin
BioMed Central

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/210549.php?nfid=79339

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