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line415

Reged: 09/09/06
Posts: 976
Loc: New Jersey
Which calcium supplement do you suggest of IBS-D?
      #290321 - 11/16/06 08:30 PM

I'd like to try to take a calcium supplement, but I'm not sure which one or how much. I did a search but I'm not sure about the whole calcium-magnesium ratio (I understand that magnesium helps to absorb the calcium, but can you just take calcium by itself?) I thought the calcium might also help with D. Is it calcium citrate that I should be looking for in the store? How many milligrams/day and does it matter if you take it before/after food, morning or night? Thanks.

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Originally IBS-D for a million years!
Then IBS-A, Now a transformed slightly C

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K2

Reged: 01/29/06
Posts: 1191
Loc: Canada
Re: Which calcium supplement do you suggest of IBS-D? new
      #290322 - 11/16/06 08:35 PM

I take a tablet which has 333mg calcium, 150mg magnesium. Any calcium/magnesium supplement will have the correct ratio. I can't remember what type of calcium it is though, and I don't have the original bottle.

When I was less stable (had more D) I took Calcium only. I switched to the magnesium ones cuz they were cheaper, and I have no problems with them either.

I used to take 3 per day but now only 1, since I am also getting calcium from soy milk, and enriched cereals (my oatmeal has calcium). I usually take it with a meal, lunch or dinner usually.

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Kat

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Sand

Reged: 12/13/04
Posts: 4488
Loc: West Orange, NJ (IBS-D)
Re: Which calcium supplement do you suggest of IBS-D? new
      #290323 - 11/16/06 08:44 PM

I did some research on this a while back and this is what I came up with:

calcium citrate is good if you’re constipated (Citracal)

calcium carbonate is good if you have diarrhea:
Tums (but they have mineral oil)
Caltrate
OsCal
Viactiv (but most - perhaps all - flavors have dairy)

My understanding is that magnesium is bad for diarrhea so I don't take it and no one - not my Family Practice doctor or my orthopedist or my endocrinologist - has suggested I do so.

I take my calcium in the form of Tums. At some point I read that your body can't handle more than 500mg of calcium at a time, so that's how much I take at once. I take mine with lunch, with dinner, and right before bed for a total of 1500mg a day. I like Tums because I have mild reflux so I'm getting 2 for the price of 1, but I think *any* calcium carbonate will have an antacid effect because - as far as I can tell - it's the calcium carbonate itself that acts as the antacid in Tums. There's nothing else in there except color and flavor.

I started very slowly with 200mg of calcium per day and went up very slowly, adding no more than 200mg per day at a time.

I have a vague sense that calcium is more "bioavailable" if you take it with food - I guess you're fooling your body into thinking you're eating something that has calcium - but I don't know that for sure.

One thing I did find out was that I'm not getting enough Vitamin D. My endocrinologist checked for that the last time I saw her. Apparently you need Vitamin D to process calcium. She wants me to get 1200 IU of Vitamin D per day which is 3 times the Recommended Daily Allowance - you should check with your doctor before getting that much. I've been getting 400 from my multi-vitamin (One A Day Essential) and I'm adding the rest gradually - 200 IU at a time. If you're out and about outside your body is probably making enough Vitamin D from the exposure to sunlight. Some calcium supplements have Vitamin D built right in.

So:
calcium carbonate if you're IBS-D
1500mg per day
500mg at a time
make sure you're getting or your body is making enough Vitamin D

HTH.

--------------------
[Research tells us fourteen out of any ten individuals likes chocolate. - Sandra Boynton]

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line415

Reged: 09/09/06
Posts: 976
Loc: New Jersey
Re: Which calcium supplement do you suggest of IBS-D? new
      #290326 - 11/16/06 09:01 PM

Thank you both. I will have to check if my oatmeal has calcium b/c at least I'm eating that pretty much every morning. I will also need to check my bottle of Tums. I need to buy a new one b/c these were the multi-flavored ones and I saw sucrose on the list. I'll go to the drug store tomorrow and check out Caltrate too. I assume I get enough vitamin D from being out and about but I should probably have the doctor check, especially in the winter months. Thanks for the suggestions...I'm hopeful it will help with d too. I had a minor attack today and I was tempted to spoon feed myself some Acacia to stop it on the spot!! Too bad it isn't that easy...so hello Immodium again, but I'll get back on track tomorrow.

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Originally IBS-D for a million years!
Then IBS-A, Now a transformed slightly C

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Jeio

Reged: 09/28/06
Posts: 482
Re: Which calcium supplement do you suggest of IBS-D? new
      #290351 - 11/17/06 07:14 AM

Just a question, is getting more sun exposure not possible for you? I think as little as 15 minutes a day are enough to produce all the Vitamin D you need.

http://www.nysopep.org/page.cfm/65 sais
Quote:


Vitamin D is often referred to as the "sunshine vitamin". That is because the human body can make vitamin D from casual sun exposure of short duration (as little as 5 to 15 minutes of sunshine per day, 2 to 3 times per week on the face and hands). Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is stored in body fat. In general, adults (up to age 70) and children living in New York State can get enough casual sun exposure from March to October to store a significant amount of vitamin D. It can later be released for the body's use during the winter months.

There are factors, however, that limit the body's ability to make vitamin D from sun exposure. Some of these factors include the use of sunscreen and/or sun-protective clothing, cloudy northern climate, and window glass that blocks the sun. In addition, with aging (in senior adults over age 70), the ability to make vitamin D from sunlight exposure is greatly reduced.





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Sand

Reged: 12/13/04
Posts: 4488
Loc: West Orange, NJ (IBS-D)
Re: Which calcium supplement do you suggest of IBS-D? new
      #290361 - 11/17/06 07:48 AM

Hmm. I'm not exactly outdoor girl but I do spend at least an average of 15 minutes outside during the warmer months. Just running errands would give me that much sun exposure. I see my endocrinologist again in the Spring - I'll try to get her to explain this more.

Thanks for the info.

--------------------
[Research tells us fourteen out of any ten individuals likes chocolate. - Sandra Boynton]

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Syl

Reged: 03/13/05
Posts: 5495
Loc: SK, CANADA
Vitamin D new
      #290363 - 11/17/06 07:49 AM

The research is beginning to show that people who live in north areas need to take a vitamin D supplement at least in the winter time. A colleague works for a large pharmaceutical company managing drug trials. Vitamnin D is one of the vitamins that is being measured in some of the trials. They are finding vitamin D deficiencies on a regular basis in people from north areas.

Here are a couple of links to some interesting information on vitamin D.

http://www.healthyontario.com/Health_Feature/Vitamin_D-eficiency.htm
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminD/
http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/982088787.html

And here is an interesting article on vitamin D deficiency in GI disease.

Reference
Javorsky, B. R., N. Maybee, S. H. Padia, and A. C. Dalkin, 2006: Vitamin D Deficiency in Gastrointestinal Disease. Practical Gastroenterology, XXIX, 52-72

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STABLE: ♂, IBS-D 50+ years - Science of IBS

The FODMAP Approach to Managing IBS Symptoms
Evidence-based Dietary Management of Functional GI Symptoms: The FODMAP Approach
FODMAP Chart & Cheatsheet
The Role of Food & Dietary Intervention in IBS

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K2

Reged: 01/29/06
Posts: 1191
Loc: Canada
Re: Vitamin D new
      #290368 - 11/17/06 07:55 AM

From an up-northerner, yep there's no way I'm getting 15mins a day of sunshine. I've seen the sun twice so far in November. In the winter, it's just too cold to be outside for very long, and usually I'm completely bundled with just my eyes showing. They do enrich soy milks (and probably rice and almond milks) with Vitamin D as well, but taking a supplement too may not be a bad idea.

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Kat

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line415

Reged: 09/09/06
Posts: 976
Loc: New Jersey
Bump-question about calcium/ Caltrate-for Sand or anyone else who can suggest new
      #290583 - 11/19/06 10:41 AM

Sand, you suggested Caltrate as a calcium supplement. I saw that both the Caltrate 600+D and the Caltrate 600+D+minerals had sucrose in their ingredients list. My tums has sucrose listed too. Is this still safe? Do they all carry some sucrose? (They are not the multi-flavored/colored...just regular)

--------------------
Originally IBS-D for a million years!
Then IBS-A, Now a transformed slightly C

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Syl

Reged: 03/13/05
Posts: 5495
Loc: SK, CANADA
Sucrose is safe ... new
      #290628 - 11/19/06 04:54 PM

Sucrose is the same as white table sugar and it is safe in moderate amounts.


--------------------
STABLE: ♂, IBS-D 50+ years - Science of IBS

The FODMAP Approach to Managing IBS Symptoms
Evidence-based Dietary Management of Functional GI Symptoms: The FODMAP Approach
FODMAP Chart & Cheatsheet
The Role of Food & Dietary Intervention in IBS

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