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All Boards >> Irritable Bowel Syndrome Research Library

HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7677
Loc: Seattle, WA
Intestinal Microbiota And Diet in IBS
      01/27/15 11:50 AM

Review

Am J Gastroenterol advance online publication 27 January 2015; doi: 10.1038/ajg.2014.427

Intestinal Microbiota And Diet in IBS: Causes, Consequences, or Epiphenomena?

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Mirjana Rajilić-Stojanović PhD1, Daisy M Jonkers PhD2, Anne Salonen PhD3, Kurt Hanevik MD, PhD4, Jeroen Raes PhD5, Jonna Jalanka PhD6, Willem M de Vos PhD3,6,7, Chaysavanh Manichanh PhD8, Natasa Golic PhD9, Paul Enck PhD10, Elena Philippou PhD11, Fuad A Iraqi PhD12, Gerard Clarke PhD13, Robin C Spiller MD, PhD14 and John Penders PhD15

Abstract

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous functional disorder with a multifactorial etiology that involves the interplay of both host and environmental factors. Among environmental factors relevant for IBS etiology, the diet stands out given that the majority of IBS patients report their symptoms to be triggered by meals or specific foods. The diet provides substrates for microbial fermentation, and, as the composition of the intestinal microbiota is disturbed in IBS patients, the link between diet, microbiota composition, and microbial fermentation products might have an essential role in IBS etiology. In this review, we summarize current evidence regarding the impact of diet and the intestinal microbiota on IBS symptoms, as well as the reported interactions between diet and the microbiota composition. On the basis of the existing data, we suggest pathways (mechanisms) by which diet components, via the microbial fermentation, could trigger IBS symptoms. Finally, this review provides recommendations for future studies that would enable elucidation of the role of diet and microbiota and how these factors may be (inter)related in the pathophysiology of IBS.

Continue to full article: http://www.nature.com/ajg/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ajg2014427a.html

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Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

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Subject Posted by Posted on
* Diet HeatherAdministrator 07/14/03 01:58 PM
. * Diet, lifestyle outweigh genetic impact on gut microbiome HeatherAdministrator   03/19/18 02:39 PM
. * Fecal Profiling May Predict Dietary Response in IBS to FODMAPS Diet HeatherAdministrator   03/15/18 11:51 AM
. * Can a Western diet permanently alter the immune system? HeatherAdministrator   01/19/18 01:17 PM
. * High-fat diet leads to same intestinal inflammation as a virus HeatherAdministrator   06/23/17 04:25 PM
. * Gluten-free diet could increase cardiovascular risk in people without celiac disease HeatherAdministrator   05/09/17 01:35 PM
. * Gut microbiome profiles predict response to low FODMAP diet in IBS HeatherAdministrator   11/02/16 02:45 PM
. * Fructose malabsorption, symptom severity, IBS subtype predict response to low FODMAP diet HeatherAdministrator   06/27/16 02:44 PM
. * Fiber-Rich Diet May Boost Lung Function HeatherAdministrator   01/27/16 02:52 PM
. * 'Very limited evidence' to show FODMAPS diet helps IBS