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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Herbs, Probiotics, and Supplements
      #13952 - 07/14/03 01:53 PM

All articles regarding herbs as medicine, probiotics, and other non-prescription supplements for IBS should be posted here.



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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Peppermint oil capsules for the treatment of IBS in children. new
      #13988 - 07/14/03 03:49 PM

J Pediatr. 2001 Jan;138(1):125-8.

Enteric-coated, pH-dependent peppermint oil capsules for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in children.

Kline RM, Kline JJ, Di Palma J, Barbero GJ.

University of Missouri-Columbia, Department of Child Health, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Columbia, Missouri, USA.

In a randomized, double-blind controlled trial, 42 children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were given pH-dependent, enteric-coated peppermint oil capsules or placebo. After 2 weeks, 75% of those receiving peppermint oil had reduced severity of pain associated with IBS. Peppermint oil may be used as a therapeutic agent during the symptomatic phase of IBS.

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 11148527 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Peppermint-oil capsules in the treatment of IBS: a prospective, randomized trial new
      #13989 - 07/14/03 03:51 PM

J Gastroenterol. 1997 Dec;32(6):765-8.

Enteric-coated peppermint-oil capsules in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: a prospective, randomized trial.

Liu JH, Chen GH, Yeh HZ, Huang CK, Poon SK.

Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan.

To determine the efficacy and tolerability of an enteric-coated peppermint-oil formulation (Colpermin), we conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study in 110 outpatients (66 men/44 women; 18-70 years of age) with symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Patients took one capsule (Colpermin or placebo) three to four times daily, 15-30 min before meals, for 1 month. Fifty-two patients on Colpermin and 49 on placebo completed the study. Forty-one patients on Colpermin (79%) experienced an alleviation of the severity of abdominal pain (29 were pain-free); 43 (83%) had less abdominal distension, 43 (83%) had reduced stool frequency, 38 (73%) had fewer borborygmi, and 41 (79%) less flatulence. Corresponding figures for the placebo group were: 21 patients (43%) with reduced pain (4 were pain-free), 14 (29%) with reduced distension, 16 (32%) with reduced stool frequency, 15 (31%) with fewer borborygmi, and 11 (22%) with less flatulence. Symptom improvements after Colpermin were significantly better than after placebo (P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). One patient on Colpermin experienced heartburn (because of chewing the capsules) and one developed a mild transient skin rash. There were no significant changes in liver function test results. Thus, in this trial, Colpermin was effective and well tolerated.

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 9430014 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Ginger for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy new
      #13990 - 07/14/03 03:55 PM

Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Apr;97(4):577-82. Related Articles, Links


Ginger for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy: randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial.

Vutyavanich T, Kraisarin T, Ruangsri R.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. tvutyava@mail.med.cmu.ac.th

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of ginger for the treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. METHODS: Women with nausea and vomiting of pregnancy, who first attended an antenatal clinic at or before 17 weeks' gestation, were invited to participate in the study. During a 5-month period, 70 eligible women gave consent and were randomized in a double-masked design to receive either oral ginger 1 g per day or an identical placebo for 4 days. Subjects graded the severity of their nausea using visual analog scales and recorded the number of vomiting episodes in the previous 24 hours before treatment, and again during 4 consecutive days while taking treatment. At a follow-up visit 7 days later, five-item Likert scales were used to assess the severity of their symptoms. RESULTS: All participants except three in the placebo group remained in the study. The visual analog scores of posttherapy minus baseline nausea decreased significantly in the ginger group (2.1 +/- 1.9) compared with the placebo group (0.9 +/- 2.2, P =.014). The number of vomiting episodes also decreased significantly in the ginger group (1.4 +/- 1.3) compared with the placebo group (0.3 +/- 1.1, P <.001). Likert scales showed that 28 of 32 in the ginger group had improvement in nausea symptoms compared with 10 of 35 in the placebo group (P <.001). No adverse effect of ginger on pregnancy outcome was detected. CONCLUSION: Ginger is effective for relieving the severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy.

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 11275030 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Treatment for constipation-predominant IBS using Padma Lax, a Tibetan herbal formula new
      #14155 - 07/15/03 11:24 PM

Digestion. 2002;65(3):161-71.

A novel treatment for constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome using Padma Lax, a Tibetan herbal formula.

Sallon S, Ben-Arye E, Davidson R, Shapiro H, Ginsberg G, Ligumsky M.

The Natural Medicine Research Unit, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. ssallon@hadassah.org.il

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Padma Lax, a complex Tibetan herbal formula for constipation was evaluated for safety and effectiveness in treating constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome in a 3-month double-blind randomised pilot study. METHODS: Patients were recruited from Hadassah Hospital's Gastroenterology clinic, using the Rome I Criteria for irritable bowel syndrome, and the international consensus criteria for constipation. Symptom severity was evaluated monthly by patients and gastroenterologist, using categorical and numerical rating scales. A patient diary recorded daily stool habit and trial medication. RESULTS: In 61 patients, (34 Padma Lax, 27 placebo), significant improvement was demonstrated after 3 months in the Padma Lax group compared to placebo in constipation, severity of abdominal pain, and its effect on daily activities, incomplete evacuation, abdominal distension and flatus/flatulence. A global assessment indicated that significantly more Padma Lax patients, compared to placebo, rated the current treatment superior to previous therapies tried for irritable bowel. Laboratory parameters displayed no clinically significant changes. Side effects, primarily loose stools in 7 Padma Lax patients responded well to lowering treatment dosage from 2 to 1 capsule/day. CONCLUSIONS: Padma Lax is a safe and effective treatment for constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome and may offer an alternative to the current multi drug approach. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 12138321 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] web page


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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Study on the efficacy of Lactobacillus in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. new
      #14326 - 07/18/03 11:42 AM

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2001 Oct;13(10):1143-7.

A controlled, double-blind, randomized study on the efficacy of Lactobacillus plantarum 299V in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

Niedzielin K, Kordecki H, Birkenfeld B.

Department of Gastroenterology, M. Curie Regional Hospital, Szczecin, Poland. Krzysztof.Niedzielin@mepha.com.pl

BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a widespread functional disorder of the digestive tract. Its aetiology is unknown and therapeutic options are limited. Recent reports suggest that probiotics may have a role in regulating the motility of the digestive tract. AIM: To assess the efficacy of Lactobacillus plantarum 299V (LP299V) in patients with IBS. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty patients were randomized to receive either LP299V in liquid suspension (20 patients) or placebo (20 patients) over a period of 4 weeks. Clinical examination was performed at baseline and at the end of the study. Additionally, patients assessed their symptoms by applying a scoring system. RESULTS: All patients treated with LP299V reported resolution of their abdominal pain as compared to 11 patients from a placebo group (P = 0.0012). There was also a trend towards normalization of stools frequency in constipated patients in six out of 10 patients treated with LP299V compared with two out of 11 treated with placebo (P = 0.17). With regards to all IBS symptoms an improvement was noted in 95% of patients in the LP299V group vs 15% of patients in the placebo group (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: LP299V seems to have a beneficial effect in patients with IBS. Further studies on larger cohorts of patients and with longer duration of therapy are required in order to establish the place of L. plantarum in the treatment of IBS.

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 11711768 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Alteration of intestinal microflora and reduced IBS bloating and pain new
      #14335 - 07/18/03 12:01 PM

Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 May;95(5):1231-8.

Alteration of intestinal microflora is associated with reduction in abdominal bloating and pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

Nobaek S, Johansson ML, Molin G, Ahrne S, Jeppsson B.

Department of Surgery, Lund University, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.

OBJECTIVE: The influence of the gastrointestinal (GI) microflora in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has not been clearly elucidated. This study was undertaken to see if patients with IBS have an imbalance in their normal colonic flora, as some bacterial taxa are more prone to gas production than others. We also wanted to study whether the flora could be altered by exogenous supplementation. In a previous study we have characterized the mucosa-associated lactobacilli in healthy individuals and found some strains with good colonizing ability. Upon colonization, they seemed to reduce gas formation. METHODS: The study comprised 60 patients with IBS and a normal colonoscopy or barium enema. Patients fulfilling the Rome criteria, without a history of malabsorption, and with normal blood tests underwent a sigmoidoscopy with biopsy. They were randomized into two groups, one receiving 400 ml per day of a rose-hip drink containing 5 x 10(7) cfu/ml of Lactobacillus plantarum (DSM 9843) and 0.009 g/ml oat flour, and the other group receiving a plain rose-hip drink, comparable in color, texture, and taste. The administration lasted for 4 wk. The patients recorded their own GI function, starting 2 wk before the study and continuing throughout the study period. Twelve months after the end of the study all patients were asked to complete the same questionnaire regarding their symptomatology as at the start of the study. RESULTS: All patients tolerated the products well. The patients receiving Lb. plantarum had these bacteria on rectal biopsies. There were no major changes of Enterobacteriaceae in either group, before or after the study, but the Enterococci increased in the placebo group and remained unchanged in the test group. Flatulence was rapidly and significantly reduced in the test group compared with the placebo group (number of days with abundant gas production, test group 6.5 before, 3.1 after vs 7.4 before and 5.6 after for the placebo group). Abdominal pain was reduced in both groups. At the 12-month follow-up, patients in the test group maintained a better overall GI function than control patients. There was no difference between the groups regarding bloating. Fifty-nine percent of the test group patients had a continuous intake of fermented products, whereas the corresponding figure for the control patients was 73%. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study indicate that the administration of Lb. plantarum with known probiotic properties decreased pain and flatulence in patients with IBS. The fiber content of the test solution was minimal and it is unlikely that the fiber content could have had any effect. This type of probiotic therapy warrants further studies in IBS patients.

Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial web page

PMID: 10811333 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Efficacy of ginger for nausea and vomiting: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials. new
      #14637 - 07/22/03 06:50 PM

Br J Anaesth. 2000 Mar;84(3):367-71.

Efficacy of ginger for nausea and vomiting: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

Ernst E, Pittler MH.

Department of Complementary Medicine, School of Postgraduate Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Exeter, UK.

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is often advocated as beneficial for nausea and vomiting. Whether the herb is truly efficacious for this condition is, however, still a matter of debate. We have performed a systematic review of the evidence from randomized controlled trials for or against the efficacy of ginger for nausea and vomiting. Six studies met all inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Three on postoperative nausea and vomiting were identified and two of these suggested that ginger was superior to placebo and equally effective as metoclopramide. The pooled absolute risk reduction for the incidence of postoperative nausea, however, indicated a non-significant difference between the ginger and placebo groups for ginger 1 g taken before operation (absolute risk reduction 0.052 (95% confidence interval -0.082 to 0.186)). One study was found for each of the following conditions: seasickness, morning sickness and chemotherapy-induced nausea. These studies collectively favoured ginger over placebo.

Publication Types:
Review
Review Literature
web page
PMID: 10793599 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Ginger: history and use for the prevention of nausea, dizziness, and vomiting new
      #14638 - 07/22/03 06:52 PM

Adv Ther. 1998 Jan-Feb;15(1):25-44.

Ginger: history and use.

Langner E, Greifenberg S, Gruenwald J.

Phytopharm Consulting, Berlin, Germany.

Ginger is well known in the form of ginger sticks or ginger ale. If these are consumed during travel, the traveler imbibes, albeit subconsciously, a healing plant for motion sickness. The efficacy of ginger rhizome for the prevention of nausea, dizziness, and vomiting as symptoms of motion sickness (kinetosis), as well as for postoperative vomiting and vomiting of pregnancy, has been well documented and proved beyond doubt in numerous high-quality clinical studies. The use of this ancient medicine for gastrointestinal problems (stimulation of digestion) has been given scientific approval. Today, medicinal ginger is used mainly for prevention of the symptoms of travel sickness.

Publication Types:
Review
Review, Tutorial

PMID: 10178636 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Probiotics Significantly Reduce Symptoms of IBS, Ulcerative Colitis new
      #14643 - 07/22/03 09:41 PM

Medscape Medical News

Probiotics Significantly Reduce Symptoms of IBS, Ulcerative Colitis

by Martha Kerr

May 21, 2003 (Orlando) — Probiotic therapy, primarily in the form of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacteria infantis, significantly improves symptoms and quality of life in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other bowel disorders, researchers reported in a number of presentations here at Digestive Disease Week 2003.

In a study designed to assess the efficacy of probiotics alone or in combination with antibiotics in patients with IBS, Stephen M. Faber, MD, from Albemarle Gastroenterology Associates, PC, in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, evaluated treatment in 44 patients with IBS. Twenty patients received probiotics alone and 24 received ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily for one week and two probiotic formulations, Lactobacillus (NCFM) 10 billion/g and Bifidobacteia infantis (Bifdo), 10 billion/g for four weeks.

Patients completed the IBS-Quality of Life (IBS-QOL) questionnaire and the Symptom Frequency Index (SFI) before and after treatment. For the study group as a whole, IBS-QOL scores averaged 66.2 before treatment and 84.6 after treatment. SFI scores before treatment averaged 38, decreasing to 18 after treatment.

In patients who received both probiotics and antibiotics, IBS-QOL scores averaged 67.6 before and 87.8 after treatment. SFI scores averaged 35 at baseline, decreasing to 18 after treatment.

In the probiotic-only group, baseline IBS-QOL scores were 69.3, increasing to 86.4 after treatment. SFI scores were 39 at baseline and 17 after treatment.

Differences in IBS-QOL and SFI scores between probiotic plus antibiotic treatment and probiotic-only treatment were statistically insignificant, Dr. Faber reported.

A retrospective look at IBS patients treated with probiotics indicates that there is a deficiency of Lactobacillus in the gut flora in patients with IBS, Dr. Faber noted, "but we're not ready to call IBS an infectious disease."

Probiotic therapy also improved symptoms of ulcerative colitis (UC) in a separate study presented by Richard N. Fedorak, MD, professor of medicine and director of the division of gastroenterology at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada.

In a safety and efficacy study of the probiotic formulation VSL3 (VSL Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Ft. Lauderdale, FL), which contains eight lactic acid bacterial species, Dr. Fedorak and colleagues evaluated 30 patients with active mild-to-moderate UC with recent flares. Patients continued with previous treatment that included mesalamine, corticosteroids, and/or azathiaprine, as long as the treatment regimen was stable prior to the study.

Patients took two VSL3 sachets twice a day for six weeks. Ulcerative Colitis Clinical Scores were measured and sigmoidoscopy performed at baseline and after the six-week treatment period.

Dr. Fedorak reported that remission occurred in 63% (19 patients) and there was a clinical response in an additional 23% (seven patients). There was no response in 13% (four patients). Worsening of symptoms occurred in one patient.

Dr. Fedorak said that probiotic therapy was not associated with any adverse clinical or biochemical events.

"I haven't heard of getting into trouble with probiotics," Dr. Faber told Medscape. "These are organisms that are supposed to be in the gut. The body knows how to control them, so it doesn't seem that you can overtreat."

While probiotics have been recognized as beneficial components of food, Dr. Fedorak pointed out that "we don't use it as a food product anymore but as a treatment.

"Infantile diarrhea can be shortened by about a day from the usual three- to four-day course. That is very important in infants. Probiotics are effective with rotavirus symptoms, with antibiotic-induced diarrhea, in pseudomembranous colitis, and perhaps in radiation-induced diarrhea," he said.

But Dr. Fedorak cautioned that "we don't know how they work. They appear to strengthen the mucosal barrier of the bowel and improve immune function. And we don't know which probiotics to use or in what combination."

DDW 2003: Abstract M1582, presented May 19, 20003; Abstract W1523, presented May 21, 2003.
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