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HeatherAdministrator

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How Peppermint Helps to Relieve Irritable Bowel Syndrome new
      #364370 - 04/20/11 12:41 PM

How Peppermint Helps to Relieve Irritable Bowel Syndrome

ScienceDaily (Apr. 20, 2011) — University of Adelaide researchers have shown for the first time how peppermint helps to relieve Irritable Bowel Syndrome, which affects up to 20% of the population.

In a paper published in the journal Pain, researchers from the University's Nerve-Gut Research Laboratory explain how peppermint activates an "anti-pain" channel in the colon, soothing inflammatory pain in the gastrointestinal tract.

Dr Stuart Brierley says while peppermint has been commonly prescribed by naturopaths for many years, there has been no clinical evidence until now to demonstrate why it is so effective in relieving pain.

"Our research shows that peppermint acts through a specific anti-pain channel called TRPM8 to reduce pain sensing fibres, particularly those activated by mustard and chilli. This is potentially the first step in determining a new type of mainstream clinical treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)," he says.

IBS is a gastrointestinal disorder, causing abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea and/or constipation. It affects about 20% of Australians and costs millions of dollars each year in lost productivity, work absenteeism and health care.

"This is a debilitating condition and affects many people on a daily basis, particularly women who are twice as likely to experience Irritable Bowel Syndrome," Dr Brierley says.

"Some people find their symptoms appear after consuming fatty and spicy foods, coffee and alcohol, but it is more complex than that. There appears to be a definite link between IBS and a former bout of gastroenteritis, which leaves nerve pain fibres in a heightened state, altering mechanisms in the gut wall and resulting in ongoing pain."

Dr Brierley says the recent floods in Queensland and Victoria could result in a spike of gastroenteritis cases in Australia due to the contamination of some water supplies in affected regions.

He said case studies in Europe and Canada showed that many people who contracted gastroenteritis from contaminated water supplies went on to experience IBS symptoms that persisted for at least eight years.

There is no cure for IBS and it often comes and goes over a person's lifetime.

Apart from gastroenteritis and food intolerance, IBS can be brought on by food poisoning, stress, a reaction to antibiotics, and in some cases is genetic.

Dr Brierley is one of 25 researchers who work at the University of Adelaide's Nerve-Gut Research Laboratory, hoping to find cures and treatments for a range of intestinal diseases.

Story Source:

The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by University of Adelaide.

Journal Reference:

1. Andrea M. Harrington, Patrick A. Hughes, Christopher M. Martin, Jing Yang, Joel Castro, Nicole J. Isaacs, L. Ashley Blackshaw, Stuart M. Brierley. A novel role for TRPM8 in visceral afferent function. Pain, 2011; DOI: 10.1016/j.pain.2011.01.027


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110419101234.htm

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HeatherAdministrator

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Probiotic Pills Better for IBS than Yogurt new
      #366177 - 09/30/11 12:06 PM

Probiotic pills better for IBS than Yogurt

Sep 23, 2011 3:30 PM

Probiotic pills ease irritable bowel syndrome and other stomach problems more effectively than yogurt with probiotics, a recent survey of Consumer Reports subscribers suggests. Probiotics are helpful bacteria that naturally occur in the intestines. Other recent research concluded that probiotics, in yogurt or pills, might also help prevent colds.

In the Consumer Reports survey, 1,019 people said they took probiotic supplements to ease their stomach problems and 1,121 people said they consumed yogurt with lactobacillus acidophilus, a common probiotic. A third of the supplement users said the probiotic helped a lot, compared with 17 percent and 20 percent of those who consumed the yogurt for their IBS or another digestive disorder, respectively. Among people who used probiotics for their general health, those who took pills were more likely than those who consumed yogurt to get probiotics on all or most days.

Respondents said that neither supplements nor yogurt worked as well as prescription drugs.

The analysis on probiotics and colds, published this month by the Cochrane Collaboration, looked at 10 previous studies including 3,451 children and adults age 40 and younger who took pills or consumed yogurt for more than a week. It concluded that people who took a probiotic experienced 12 percent fewer acute upper respiratory tract infections over the study periods than those who took a placebo. In addition, people who took probiotics were less likely to need antibiotics to treat bacterial complications of those infections.

The researchers said that probiotics might help the immune system by bolstering gut wall integrity.

Bottom line: Neither our survey nor the new Cochrane analysis proves that probiotics protect the stomach or prevent colds, though they add to a growing a body of evidence suggesting they might. The survey of Consumer Reports subscribers, who may not be representative of the general population, differs from clinical trials, which has a control group and monitors dosing. Probiotics are safe for most people, though possible side effects include vomiting and flatulence. And you might need to avoid them if you’re pregnant or nursing, have a serious acute or chronic illness, or have weakened immunity, check with your doctor.

Source
Probiotics (live micro-organisms) to prevent upper respiratory tract infections (for example, the common cold) [Cochrane Collaboration]

—Sue Byrne


http://news.consumerreports.org/health/2011/09/probiotic-pills-might-help-with-ibsand-colds-too.html

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HeatherAdministrator

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Dr. Oz Recommends Peppermint Oil Capsules new
      #366435 - 11/23/11 02:32 PM

Dr. Oz, formerly of the Oprah Winfrey show, discussed Irritable Bowel Syndrome on a recent show, and featured Peppermint Oil Capsules for IBS relief. Watch the video of the Dr. Oz show

Learn more about peppermint for IBS here

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HeatherAdministrator

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Today Show Recommends Peppermint Oil Caps for IBS new
      #366479 - 12/02/11 03:58 PM

Watch a video clip of the show here http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/3041426/ns/today-today_health/#45524188

The focus was on natural remedies for various ailments, including peppermint oil caps for IBS.

More info about peppermint oil caps here http://www.helpforibs.com/shop/suplmts/pmintcaps.asp

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HeatherAdministrator

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Probiotics May Prevent Antibiotic Diarrhea new
      #367422 - 05/09/12 12:38 PM

Probiotics May Prevent Antibiotic Diarrhea

By Crystal Phend, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Published: May 08, 2012

Reviewed by Dori F. Zaleznik, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner
1 comment(s)

A meta-analysis of 62 trials concluded that probiotic administration significantly reduced the incidence of diarrhea associated with administration of antibiotics.

Note that there was unexplained heterogeneity among studies and that the actual composition of the probiotics used in the different trials was poorly documented.

Probiotics appear to fight diarrhea that occurs as a common side effect of antibiotic treatment, a meta-analysis affirmed.

Probiotic administration was associated with a 42% reduced relative risk of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (P<0.001), Susanne Hempel, PhD, of RAND Health in Santa Monica, Calif., and colleagues found.

The number needed to treat to prevent one case of diarrhea from antibiotic use was just 13, they reported in the May 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Antibiotics lead to diarrhea in as many as 30% of patients, which is an important cause of nonadherence to the drugs.

"Potentially, probiotics maintain or restore gut microecology during or after antibiotic treatment through receptor competition, competition for nutrients, inhibition of epithelial and mucosal adherence of pathogens, introduction of lower colonic pH favoring the growth of nonpathogenic species, stimulation of immunity, or production of antimicrobial substances," the group suggested.

In children, probiotics have proven effective in preventing antibiotic-induced diarrhea and treating acute infectious diarrhea.

Most of the evidence, though, has accrued in adult trials almost universally underpowered to show the kind of impact seen in Hempel's analysis.

The meta-analysis included 82 randomized controlled trials, 57 of which used Lactobacillus-based interventions alone or in combination with other genera of probiotics (32 with Bifidobacterium). All but two trials used probiotics to prevent rather than treat existing antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

The effect on diarrhea risk could be pooled from 63 of the trials, with a total of 11,811 participants, and remained significant at P<0.001 when excluding any individual trial.

The trials where Lactobacillus probiotics was used exclusively were associated with reduced risk of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, similar to that in the overall analysis (pooled RR 0.64, P=0.004), with a number needed to treat of 14.

The 16 trials using only yeast as the probiotic, such as Saccharomyces boulardii [cerevisiae] or Hansen CBS 5926, also showed significantly reduced risk of antibiotic-associated diarrhea with a pooled relative risk of 0.48 (P<0.001) and number needed to treat of 10.

The researchers also looked for Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Bacillus probiotic studies but found few.

Pooled results from three older trials using Enterococcus [Streptococcus] faecium SF68 showed a relative risk of 0.51 (P<0.001) and a number needed to treat of 12.

The difference between the different probiotic types wasn't significant (P=0.45) and didn't appear to explain away heterogeneity. Nor did the head-to-head comparison trials point to a clear winner.

The exact strains of the probiotic bugs used, though, were poorly documented, Hempel's group cautioned.

The analysis turned up no evidence of publication bias; no difference in probiotic treatment effect by conflict of interest status of the trials; and similar findings looking only at double-blind trials, or only at those with placebo control.

Nor did results vary for adults versus children, outpatient versus inpatient care, or by duration of antibiotic treatment.

In addition to unexplained heterogeneity among included trials and poorly documented probiotics, limitations of the study included lack of information from experts about published or unpublished studies.

"Determining which populations would benefit most from adjunct probiotics therapy is an ongoing challenge; it must be considered that antibiotic-associated diarrhea does not occur in the majority of patients and when it occurs, it is usually self-limiting," Hempel's group wrote.

Little data was available on probiotic-specific adverse events. In rare cases reported decades ago, serious adverse effects like fungemia and bacterial sepsis were reported with probiotics, the researchers noted.

The RAND Corporation internally funded the review, building on the literature database established for a contracted evidence report on the safety of probiotics commissioned by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and funded jointly by the National Institutes of Health and the FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.

The researchers reported having no conflicts of interest.

Primary source: Journal of the American Medical Association
Source reference:
Hempel S, et al "Probiotics for the prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea: a systematic review and meta-analysis" JAMA 2012; 307: 1959-1969; DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.3507.


http://www.medpagetoday.com/Gastroenterology/GeneralGastroenterology/32572?utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DailyHeadlines&utm_source=WC&eun=g379602d0r&userid=379602&email=heather@helpforibs.com&mu_id=5372841

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HeatherAdministrator

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Probiotics for GI Issues and Obesity - Problems May Take Root in Gut Flora new
      #367423 - 05/09/12 01:26 PM

Obesity, GI Issues May Take Root in Gut Flora

By John Gever, Senior Editor, MedPage Today

Published: April 22, 2012

Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.

Action Points

Manipulating the microbial flora within the intestine offers great promise for preventing or treating obesity and bowel disorders, but the precise means are not yet available.
Note that initial data for stool transplant are promising with very high response rates in patients with recurrent C. difficile infections.

NEW ORLEANS -- Manipulating the microbial flora within the intestine offers great promise for preventing or treating obesity and bowel disorders, but the precise means are not yet available, a researcher said here.

It's clear that the diverse communities of microorganisms living in the human gut are necessary to normal health, and that their derangement can lead to metabolic and gastrointestinal disorders, said Walter Coyle, MD, of the Scripps Clinic in La Jolla, Calif.

By the same token, then, it ought to be possible to alter the makeup of those communities, either to forestall development of such disorders or to treat them when they do occur, he told attendees at the American College of Physicians' annual meeting.

However, the science of the intestinal "microbiome" is still in its infancy and it remains unclear what changes to make, let alone how best to make them, Coyle said.

For starters, the mix of gut flora varies greatly between individuals. Coyle cited results of a study of three members of the same household, whose intestinal bacterial composition differed markedly.

Although environmental influences clearly help direct how an intestinal bacterial community will evolve, host factors probably also play a role. Despite the explosion in genetic research over the past 20 years, "host genetic influences [on the gut microbiome] remain unexplored," Coyle said.

One reason to suppose that host factors are important is that, after a person reaches adulthood, he or she usually has a characteristic "core" population of intestinal bacteria that remains stable even in the face of disruptions such as antibiotic treatment.

Coyle described a recent line of research in this area that may yield a new approach to obesity.

Two major categories of bacteria dominate in the intestine: Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Studies have found that obese people tend to have a higher ratio of the former to the latter.

One clinical study of 12 people eating a calorie-restricted diet for one year found that there was no weight loss until the ratio of Firmacutes to Bacteroidetes shifted.

Coyle said that it was compelling data, but cautioned that it didn't mean that simply killing the Firmacutes would lead to weight loss. It remains unknown whether metabolic changes drove the change in gut flora or the reverse, he said.

What is clear, however, is that certain microbial communities in the intestine are more efficient than others at harvesting energy from food and making it available to the human host.

He cited studies showing that gut microbes may contribute 100 to 200 calories daily to the human host.

A relatively inefficient community would be less able to contribute to weight gain and could even induce weight loss, Coyle suggested.

But consumers and the medical community are not waiting for a complete understanding of the gut microbiome and its relation to health and disease -- efforts to manipulate the microbiome are well underway, via probiotics, prebiotics, and fecal transplants.

Probiotics are now firmly entrenched and Coyle said he recommends them routinely to patients with irritable bowel disorders.

He noted that data from randomized, controlled trials are scant and difficult to interpret because of methodological variations. For irritable bowel syndrome, the best data point to a reduction in gurgling noises and bloating, with more mixed results in constipation and/or diarrhea endpoints.

Some studies with particular preparations have shown benefit against recurrent C. difficile diarrhea.

"The data are more and more compelling that we should probably be [giving probiotics] to all hospital patients," Coyle said, citing a 2007 study in which only five or six patients had to be treated to prevent one case of diarrhea.

Probiotics were shown to be helpful in ulcerative colitis in a trial, although only in patients who followed the study protocol rigorously. Many patients had no benefit, but there was "a dramatic effect" in others, Coyle said.

Also gaining popularity are prebiotics -- various types of fiber that act as fertilizer for certain types of intestinal microbes. Some breakfast cereals now boast them on their packages, although the frequent side effect of flatulence is not mentioned.

Coyle said the ideal obesity treatment, which has not yet appeared, could be a prebiotic that promotes a microbial mix with a lower "energy harvest" in the intestine.

Another more direct method for altering the gut microbiome is through fecal transplants. These are the only direct way to artificially boost anaerobic species, which make up about 99.9% of gut bacteria, according to Coyle.

At this point, most clinical studies have been case series involving diarrheal diseases. The initial data are promising, Coyle said, with very high response rates in patients with recurrent C. difficile infections.

To the extent that the gut microbiome helps drives obesity, fecal transplants could become a treatment approach.

Some early tests have been performed in animals, Coyles said. For example, germ-free but otherwise normal mice receiving stool from genetically fat mice showed greater weight gain compared with normal mice with wild-type flora.

That study did not test whether fat mice would lose weight after receiving stool from a thin animal, however, and whether artificially altering the gut microbiome in humans will lead to weight loss or gain remains speculative.

Coyle reported consulting or speaking fees from Takeda and CSA Medical, but declared that he had no financial relationships with companies selling probiotics or prebiotics.

Primary source: American College of Physicians
Source reference:
Coyle W "Our gut flora: the internist's guide" ACP 2012.


http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/ACP/32295

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HeatherAdministrator

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Probiotic treatments relieve irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in recent study new
      #369074 - 01/18/13 02:38 PM

Probiotic treatments relieve irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in recent study

(dailyRx News) The pain and inconvenience of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be made worse by not knowing how to prevent or treat a flare-up. Many doctors believe that IBS results from changes in bacteria in the colon. They also believe that managing this bacteria can help ease symptoms.

A recent small study investigates the use of a probiotic treatment to balance colon bacteria in patients with IBS.

The use of the probiotic treatment was shown to benefit the study participants with IBS.
"Ask your doctor about probiotic supplements and foods."

The probiotic treatment, a bifid triple viable capsule, contained Bifidobacterium longum and Lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria.

Sixty participants with IBS were randomly assigned to either receive the probiotic treatment or a placebo in the double blind study conducted by Shusheng Cui of the Hunagpu District Center Hospital in Shanghai, China and Ying Hu of the Xinghua Hospital at the University of Jiaotong in Shangai, China.

The 37 participants in the probiotic group ingested two of the capsules three times a day and the 23 participants in the placebo group ingested 200 mg of placebo capsule a day. The participants ingested the capsules for a total of four weeks.

Study participants completed questionnaires to determine IBS symptoms at the beginning of the study and at the end of the study.

Both groups of participants were similar in age, gender, bowel habit, symptoms and IBS severity.

Fecal samples were collected from the probiotic group at the beginning and end of the study. The placebo group submitted a fecal sample at the beginning of the study only.

DNA was taken from the fecal samples and analyzed for microbial content.

At the end of the study, a significant difference was seen between the two groups in time, frequency of pain, abdominal bloating and bowel habit satisfaction.

The probiotic group showed an effective rate of 64.86 percent on symptom reduction. The placebo group showed an effective rate of 30.43 percent.

As expected, the presence of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus bacteria were significantly greater at the end of the study than at the beginning in the probiotic group.

Deborah Gordon, MD, and CEO of DrDeborahMD.com suggests IBS patients increase their ingestion of probiotics through food sources like aged cheese, sauerkraut, kefir and kombucha. Use of supplements is a valid option if the food sources are not viable for the individual.

“It has been well studied that people with inflammatory bowel disease have disordered gut flora and that treatment with varied probiotics and prebiotics can be helpful in disease management and treatment,” Dr. Gordon said.

The study suggest that future studies should focus on identifying the mechanisms that make probiotics successful.

The study was published in the June issue of the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.

http://www.dailyrx.com/probiotic-treatments-relieve-irritable-bowel-syndrome-symptoms-recent-study

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HeatherAdministrator

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Efficacy of Peppermint oil in diarrhea predominant IBS new
      #370033 - 08/21/13 05:44 PM

Mymensingh Med J. 2013 Jan;22(1):27-30.

Efficacy of Peppermint oil in diarrhea predominant IBS - a double blind randomized placebo - controlled study.

Alam MS, Roy PK, Miah AR, Mollick SH, Khan MR, Mahmud MC, Khatun S.
Source

Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh, Bangladesh.
Abstract

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder which is associated with considerable sufferings of patient and Peppermint oil is volatile oil, its active principle is menthol-contain a cyclic monoterpine which has anti-spasmotic properties due to its ability to block calcium channel of intestinal smooth muscles. This study observed the efficacy of peppermint oil for relieving the symptoms and changes of quality of life (QOL) in diarrhea predominant IBS. This was a prospective double blind randomized placebo-controlled study conducted in the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University during July 2008 to September 2009. Patients who fulfilled ROME II were initially selected but those had red flag signs or any organic disease was excluded from the study. Seventy four patients were enrolled in the study and randomly allocated to receive either peppermint oil or placebo three times daily for six weeks. Changes of symptoms were assessed three week interval during treatment and two weeks after the end of treatment. Data were analyzed by paired and unpaired 't' test. Finally sixty five patients completed the trial. It was observed that, at six weeks of therapy abdominal pain is markedly improved (mean±SD) 4.94±1.30 in peppermint oil group compared with 6.15±1.24 in placebo group and the difference was statistically highly significant (p>0.001). But two weeks after end of trials pain score again increased (6.09±1.93). Other symptoms and quality of life did not improve significantly. So the study result concludes that peppermint oil is effective in reliving only abdominal pain in diarrhea predominant IBS transiently.

PMID:
23416804
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23416804

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HeatherAdministrator

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The effect of enteric-coated, delayed-release peppermint oil on irritable bowel syndrome. new
      #370034 - 08/21/13 05:46 PM

Dig Dis Sci. 2010 May;55(5):1385-90. doi: 10.1007/s10620-009-0854-9. Epub 2009 Jun 9.

The effect of enteric-coated, delayed-release peppermint oil on irritable bowel syndrome.

Merat S, Khalili S, Mostajabi P, Ghorbani A, Ansari R, Malekzadeh R.
Source

Digestive Disease Research Center, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, N Kargar St, 14117 Tehran, Iran.
Abstract

Herbal remedies, particularly peppermint, have been reported to be helpful in controlling symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study on 90 outpatients with IBS. Subjects took one capsule of enteric-coated, delayed-release peppermint oil or placebo three times daily for 8 weeks. We visited patients after the first, fourth, and eighth weeks and evaluated their symptoms and quality of life. The number of subjects free from abdominal pain or discomfort changed from 0 at week 0 to 14 at week 8 in the peppermint group and from 0 to 6 in controls (P < 0.001). The severity of abdominal pain was also reduced significantly in the peppermint group as compared to controls. Furthermore, peppermint significantly improved the quality of life. There was no significant adverse reaction. Peppermint oil capsules are effective and safe as a therapeutic agent in patients with IBS suffering from abdominal pain or discomfort.

PMID:
19507027
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19507027

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HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
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Fennel is an effective herbal drug for menstrual pain new
      #370035 - 08/21/13 05:59 PM

Ayu. 2012 Apr;33(2):311-3. doi: 10.4103/0974-8520.105259.
Effect of fennel on pain intensity in dysmenorrhoea: A placebo-controlled trial.
Omidvar S, Esmailzadeh S, Baradaran M, Basirat Z.
Source

Research Scholar, Maternal and Child Health, Babol University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Iran.
Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the clinical effect of Foeniculum vulgare on primary dysmenorrhoea. Sixty virgin girls with complaints of dysmenorrhoea were enrolled in this study, out of which 50 cases were completed the course of treatment and were divided in two groups (study and placebo) and were under treatment for two cycles. In study group a capsule of 30 mg fennel extract, four times a day for three days from start of their menstrual period and in placebo a capsule containing wheat flour in same dose was administered. Intensity of pain was reported by using a 10 - point linear analogue technique. In study group the mean age of menarche was 13.1 ± 0.1 and onset age of dysmenorrhoea was 14.5 ± 0.1 years. Both groups were relieved but there was significant difference between study and placebo group. Study group shown more effective results than placebo in pain relief (P`0.05). Based on the observations, it can be concluded that, fennel is an effective herbal drug for menstrual pain.
KEYWORDS:

Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare, pain, primary dysmenorrhoea

PMID:
23559811
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3611645

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23559811

--------------------
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