Help For Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) - Education, Support, & Self Help for Irritable Bowel Syndrome   
Heather & Company View Cart  
Shop for IBSIBS Message BoardsIBS News & ReviewsStore Finder  
Home
IBS Diet & Recipes
IBS Books
IBS Supplements
Yoga for IBS
Hypnosis for IBS
Tummy Teas

All Boards >> Irritable Bowel Syndrome Research Library

Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | (show all)
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Inflammatory Bowel Disease
      #13950 - 07/14/03 01:51 PM

All articles concerning Inflammatory Bowel Diseases such as Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis should be posted here.



--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Chemo Drug Improves Crohn's Symptoms new
      #13995 - 07/14/03 04:09 PM

Chemo Drug Improves Crohn's Symptoms - Immune-Boosting Therapy Opposite of Standard Treatment

By Sid Kirchheimer
WebMD Medical News

Nov. 7, 2002 -- The painful and debilitating symptoms of Crohn's disease may be eased or even eliminated by a seemingly unlikely source -- a drug primarily used to boost immunity. A study shows Leukine to be a unique and promising new approach to treat the disease.


The irony: Crohn's has been thought to result from an overactive immune system, and traditional therapies have attempted to suppress -- not enhance -- immune activity.


Yet researchers discovered that the drug Leukine, which strengthens immune response by increasing the size and function of white blood cells, offered "significant improvement" in symptom relief for 12 of 15 Crohn's patients -- that's 80% -- who were part of the first study using this therapy.


Of those, eight went into remission, says researcher Joshua Korzenik, MD, of Washington University School of Medicine and a Crohn's specialist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis.


"It's a small study, but the outcome exceeded our expectations, especially since people were saying that the idea of stimulating immune systems that are already revved up is like throwing oil onto a raging fire," he tells WebMD. "While this treatment approach certainly isn't prime-time yet, we're extremely excited because it offers a different approach and new understanding to a disease that has defied explanation."


His findings, published in the Nov. 9 issue of The Lancet, are now the subject of a follow-up study at 30 sites throughout the U.S. If future findings are similarly promising, Leukine might be available for Crohn's patients within five years, says Korzenik. It is usually used in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy.


Leukine could provide some relief to a baffling condition that plagues nearly 500,000 Americans, causing extreme pain, diarrhea, ulcers, and other inflammation in the intestines.


"What's particularly heinous about Crohn's is the typical onset occurs in the teens or early 20s, a time when people are establishing their self-identity," notes researcher Brian Dieckgraefe, MD, PhD, also at Washington University. "So, as if going through your teens isn't bad enough, these patients also have severe daily abdominal pain, diarrhea, intestinal ulcers and abscesses."


Therapy for Crohn's patients currently involves several immune-suppressing drugs, including steroids. But many cause side effects not experienced by the test subjects using Leukine, says Korzenik. Only one medication is specifically approved by the FDA to treat Crohn's -- Remicade, which is also used to treat rheumatoid arthritis.


"But Remicade requires continuous infusion, whereas Leukine is injected, so it's a lot easier to administer," notes Seymour Katz, MD, of New York University School of Medicine and a spokesman for the American College of Gastroenterology. "Does this mean that Leukine is the only answer for Crohn's? No. Does it offer some hope for Crohn's patients? Yes. Is this an exciting finding that brings a new approach to treatment? Absolutely."

© 2002 WebMD Inc. All rights reserved.

web page






--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Hormone replacement therapy prevents bone loss in patients with IBD new
      #14115 - 07/15/03 06:02 PM

Gut. 1993 Nov;34(11):1543-6.

Hormone replacement therapy prevents bone loss in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

Clements D, Compston JE, Evans WD, Rhodes J.

Department of Medicine, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff.

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have an increased prevalence of osteoporosis, and suffer high rates of spinal bone loss. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is effective in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis but has not been studied in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A two year prospective study of HRT in inflammatory bowel disease was performed in 47 postmenopausal women aged 44 to 67 years with ulcerative colitis (25) or Crohn's disease (22). Patients had radial and spinal bone density measured annually by single photon absorptiometry and quantitative computed tomography respectively. The mean (95% confidence intervals) annual change in radial bone density was +1.42%/yr (+0.58 to +2.26; P < 0.005) and for spinal bone +2.60%/yr (+1.06 to +4.15; p < 0.005). There was no significant correlation between rates of change of bone density at the two sites, or between the rates of change and the initial bone density either in the radius or spine. Twelve patients were given prednisolone during the study, and their rates of change for spinal bone density were lower, but values were not statistically significantly different from those who did not receive corticosteroids. Changes in bone density for patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease were not significantly different. The change in bone density did not correlate with the patients' age or number of years after the menopause. It is concluded that HRT is effective in prevention of bone loss in postmenopausal women with inflammatory bowel disease.

PMID: 8244141 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

web page

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
A study of the menopause, smoking, and contraception in women with Crohn's disease. new
      #14117 - 07/15/03 06:05 PM

Q J Med. 1989 Jul;72(267):623-31.

A study of the menopause, smoking, and contraception in women with Crohn's disease.

Lichtarowicz A, Norman C, Calcraft B, Morris JS, Rhodes J, Mayberry J.

City Hospitals, Nottingham.

One hundred and ninety-six women with Crohn's disease from south-east Wales were asked to provide details of their menstrual cycles, age at menopause, history of surgery, smoking habits and use of oral contraceptives. One hundred and forty-six provided the information (response rate 77 per cent). Eighty-four were still menstruating, three were pregnant, 10 had undergone hysterectomy, one had a pharmacologically-induced menopause and 48 had had a physiological menopause. Of these 48 women, 33 were diagnosed as having Crohn's disease before the menopause. Twenty-five of these were smokers. The mean age at menopause was similar in smokers and non-smokers and in those diagnosed before and after the menopause. The mean age at menopause was between 46 and 47. A logistic analysis using the 'status quo' method showed that 50 per cent of women with Crohn's disease had the menopause at 47.6 years compared with 49.6 years in a group of healthy women from the same area. The two groups had similar smoking habits and it would seem that a premature menopause is associated with Crohn's disease.

PMID: 2608881 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
web page

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Inflammatory Bowel Disease During Pregnancy. new
      #14124 - 07/15/03 06:20 PM

Curr Treat Options Gastroenterol. 2003 Jun;6(3):227-236.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease During Pregnancy.

Tilson RS, Friedman S.

Gastroenterology Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. sfriedman1@partners.org

Physicians treating patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis will often need to care for them throughout pregnancy and deal with the surrounding issues of fertility, childbirth, and sexuality. Patients often worry about continuing medications during pregnancy and feel particularly at risk for poor birth outcomes. However, because pregnancy outcomes are most closely tied to disease activity at the time of conception, patients who are in remission when they conceive will have the most successful pregnancies. The overriding principle in treating pregnant patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is continued and close surveillance of disease activity, with aggressive medical, and if indicated, surgical treatment. With few exceptions, medicines used to induce remission before pregnancy should be continued throughout pregnancy. Pregnant women with active IBD should be followed by a gastroenterologist with experience in the issues surrounding pregnancy, and by an obstetrician with access to a tertiary referral center. Properly treated and followed, patients with IBD can expect outcomes from their pregnancies that approximate those of patients without the disease.

PMID: 12744822 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
web page

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Bacteria in Milk Linked to Crohn's Disease and Possibly IBS new
      #17056 - 08/12/03 11:55 AM

M. avium Implicated in Crohn's Disease, Perhaps Also Irritable Bowel Syndrome

By Richard Woodman

LONDON (Reuters Health) Aug 06 - Researchers said on Wednesday they had found a "highly significant" link between Crohn's disease and a mycobacterium that can be passed to humans in milk.

Professor John Hermon-Taylor and his research team at St. George's Hospital Medical School in London said they had detected Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) bacteria in 92% of ileocolonic biopsy specimens from patients with Crohn's disease but in only 26% of patients in a control group.

"The rate of detection of MAP in individuals with Crohn's disease is highly significant and implicates this pathogen in disease causation," they write in the July issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

"The problems caused by the MAP bug are a public health tragedy", said Dr. Hermon-Taylor, who has sent a copy of the paper to Britain's Chief Medical Officer, Liam Donaldson.

The study was backed by the medical charity Action Research, which said previous findings showed live MAP bacteria is present in 2% of retail pasteurised milk cartons.

"The discovery that the MAP bug is present in the vast majority of Crohn's sufferers means it is almost certainly causing the intestinal inflammation," the charity said in a statement.

It added: "Action Research does not recommend that anyone stops drinking milk. However, for those individuals with Crohn's disease or their close relatives, who may feel particularly at risk, it may be sensible to start drinking UHT milk. As UHT involves higher pasteurisation temperatures, it is probable that MAP is destroyed."

The charity called for Crohn's disease to be made a reportable condition, for more stringent milk pasteurisation, for tests for MAP in dairy herds, and procedures for reducing MAP infection on farms.

Hermon-Taylor said an unexpected finding of the research showed that patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were also infected with the MAP bug.

"In animals, MAP inflames the nerves of the gut," he said. "Recent work from Sweden shows that people with IBS also have inflamed gut nerves. There is a real chance that the MAP bug may be inflaming people's gut nerves and causing IBS."

J Clin Microbiol 2003;41:2915-2923.

web page


--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Familial Occurrence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Celiac Disease new
      #20915 - 09/16/03 03:30 PM

Familial Occurrence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Celiac Disease

Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 2003; 9(5):321-323

Mario Cottone; Ciro Marrone; Angelo Casŕ; Lorenzo Oliva; Ambrogio Orlando; Emma Calabrese; Giuseppe Martorana; Luigi Pagliaro

Background:
The authors have previously reported a possible increased risk of the familial occurrence of Crohn's disease in patients with celiac disease.

Aim:
The aim of the current study was to evaluate in a case-control study the familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in first-degree relatives of patients with celiac disease.

Methods:
One hundred eleven consecutive patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease were interviewed to ascertain whether IBD was present in first-degree relatives. The number of relatives, their ages, and possible IBD status were collected in a questionnaire. When a diagnosis of familial IBD was reported, the diagnosis was checked in the hospital records. Two hundred twenty-two controls matched for age and sex (111 from the general population and 111 from orthopedic wards) were also interviewed regarding the possible occurrence of IBD in first-degree relatives. The &#967;2 test was used to evaluate the difference in proportion of familial occurrence of IBD among individuals with celiac disease and controls.

Results:
Among 600 first-degree relatives of patients with celiac disease, 10 cases of IBD were identified among first-degree relatives (7 cases of ulcerative colitis and 3 cases of Crohn's disease), whereas only 1 case of IBD was identified among the 1,196 first-degree relatives of control patients (p < 0.01). When ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease were analyzed separately, only the prevalence of ulcerative colitis was statistically significant (p &#8804; 0.02).

Conclusions:
This case-control study shows that there is a significantly increased prevalence of familial ulcerative colitis in patients with celiac disease. There was no significant increase in the prevalence of Crohn's disease in patients with celiac disease. The possible role of this association is discussed.

web page

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Indeterminate Colitis new
      #20916 - 09/16/03 03:33 PM

Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 2003; 9(5):324-331

Indeterminate Colitis

Karel Geboes; Gert De Hertogh

Summary:
A diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) is based on a combination of clinical, histologic, endoscopic, and radiologic data. The distinction between UC and CD can be difficult because of the lack of a differentiating single gold standard. Indeterminate colitis (IC) was introduced by pathologists for the diagnosis of surgical colectomy specimens showing an overlap between the features of UC and CD. The diagnosis of IC was based on macroscopic and microscopic features. The term indeterminate colitis is in recent years more widely applied to include all cases with endoscopic, radiographic, and histologic evidence of chronic inflammatory bowel disease confined to the colon, but without fulfilment of diagnostic criteria for UC and CD. As for UC and CD, the diagnosis of IC has therefore become a clinicopathologic diagnosis. IC is generally considered to be a temporary diagnosis. The clinical characteristics of patients with IC are, however, somewhat different from the characteristics of those with UC. Furthermore, serologic markers such as perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are strongly linked with UC and CD, are both negative in a subset of patients with IC. Therefore, the possibility that IC could be a separate entity must be investigated.

web page

--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Detection of Pulmonary Involvement in Inflammatory Bowel Disease new
      #22104 - 09/30/03 01:20 PM

Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology 2003; 37(4):292-298

Pulmonary Function Tests and High-Resolution CT in the Detection of Pulmonary Involvement in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Necla Songur, MD; Yildiran Songur, MD; Meric Tuzun, MD; Ibrahim Dogan, MD; Dilek Tuzun, MD; Arzu Ensari, MD; Baki Hekimoglu, MD

Goals:
To assess the pulmonary involvement detected by pulmonary function tests (PFT) and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and to investigate the relationship of the pulmonary abnormalities with respiratory symptoms and bowel disease activity.

Methods:
23 patients with ulcerative colitis, 13 patients with Crohn disease and 14 control subjects took part in this prospective, controlled study. In all patients, detailed clinical information was obtained and extent and activity of the bowel disease were established. Each patient underwent PFT and HRCT scanning.

Results:
A pulmonary function abnormality was present in 21 of 36 patients. In IBD patients, DLCO were significantly lower, but RV/TLC was significantly higher than those of controls. HRCT revealed air trapping, fibrosis, emphysema, bronchiectasis and alveolitis in 19 patients. One-third of the patients with PFT abnormality, and 42% of the patients with HRCT abnormality were respiratory symptom free. Approximately 80% of the patients with pulmonary involvement had active bowel disease.

Conclusions:
Pulmonary involvement is common in patients with IBD. A high degree of suspicion is necessary to detect the pulmonary abnormality in IBD, because considerably large proportions of the symptom free patients have abnormal findings on HRCT and PFT.

web page



--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
HeatherAdministrator

Reged: 12/09/02
Posts: 7389
Loc: Seattle, WA
Colonoscopy Prep new
      #23729 - 10/17/03 12:05 PM

The following is an excerpt from Jill Sklar's book, The First Year Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis (Marlowe 2002), which is available here on helpforibs.com or at any major bookstore. Jill hereby gives this as her contribution to humanity:

Colonoscopy
The colonoscopy is a very versatile and useful procedure that is used for many purposes including examining for cancer, locating and excising polyps and securing biopsies that can be later examined for CD or UC. In the past, it was done on patients who were fully awake but less sadistic methods are used now, leaving most patients to ask if the procedure has started when it is already done.

As you probably have heard, the worst part is the prep, an amazing statement given that there are at least a half a dozen ways that the prep is done. The goal of the preps is to strip away any fecal matter from the intestines, thus thoroughly cleansing the intestinal walls for a better view for the endoscopist. All of the preps involve ingesting a substance that then causes intense peristaltic waves and quick evacuation of the bowels, usually taking one to three hours.

Perhaps one of the older preparation ways is the use of a product called Go-Litely, which should probably be named Go Hard and Hurtfully. This involves drinking a glass of barely palatable salty liquid every few minutes until the only thing coming out of you resembles water; a gallon is the usual amount prescribed. A variation of that is Nu-Litely, a less salty, less cumbersome but no more palatable concoction that works in the same manner. Some doctors prescribe different mixes of castor oil, citrate magnesium, Ducolax tablets or suppositories and Fleets enemas to be taken at various times in the two days leading up to the big day. Another relatively new product is Fleets phosphosoda, an intensely briny tasting liquid. The label says that the patient can mix three tablespoons of the liquid with three ounces of water; for a usual colonoscopy prep, a dose the night before and another the morning of the test usually does the trick. The X prep is similar in that it involves drinking about two doses of two ounces of the nasty tasting prep liquid. Finally, the newest prep, Visicol, allows the patient to skip the bad taste by swallowing pills chased with an eight-ounce glass of clear liquid. On the day before the test and the morning of the test, the patient has to swallow three pills every 15 minutes over an hour and a half, with the last dose being two pills; the total of pills swallowed is 40.

There are drawbacks to every prep, chiefly swallowing things that will make you feel queasy. Because this prep is primarily done at home there are a few things you can do to make it more comfortable for yourself. Remember, these are tips and suggestions; I am not a doctor and although I have survived this test more times than any doctor I know, you should always follow the directives that your doctor gives to you regarding medication and bowel cleansing solutions.

We'll start with a shopping list. Since you will be headed to the store to pick up the bottles and boxes of prep materials, pick up the following as you will need them if you don't already have them:

1.Kleenex brand Cottonelle toilet paper infused with both aloe and vitamin E or a box of baby wipes infused with aloe (the quilted wipes provide that extra degree of comfort but may not be advisable if you have a septic system).

2. Hemorrhoidal cream such as Anusol HC or any other one with HC on the label. The HC stands for hydrocortisone, a topical steroid that helps reduce swelling and itching.

3. KY Jelly or Vaseline.

4. Plenty of reading material. I prefer to read magazines that I never read as it certainly provides a diversion so I pick up such paragons of journalism such as The National Enquirer, The Star, The Sun or the Weekly World News. Any other reading material that you would consider fun or distracting is a plus here as well.

5. Scented candles or fragrant bath oil in a pleasing, relaxing scent.

6. A heating pad or hot water bottle.

7. Lots of your favorite clear liquid food items (avoid all with red or purple dyes as the dye can mistaken for inflammation) such as Canada Dry, Jell-O, Italian ice, popsicles, chicken or beef broth. Also, be sure to pick up some electrolyte containing liquids such as Gatorade or Pedialyte.

First, I have a little rule of what ever goes in must come out, kind of like Newton’s law but with a little digestive twist – call it Jill’s law. The older preps used to dictate a diet devoid of roughage and fat followed for three days before the test, with a clear liquid diet on the last day. Why? Because these things tend to hang out in the colon the longest. With less in there, it made the prep a little easier. People were told to eat baked chicken, baked fish or scrambled egg whites for protein; oils or fats less than two tablespoons for the whole day, which meant no cheese, egg yolks or fried foods; doses of soluble fiber such as plain pasta, white rice, baked potatoes and white bread; sweets like angel food cake or vanilla wafers; and plenty of clear liquids such as broth, weak tea or coffee without cream, soda pop and clear juices such as apple juice or white grape juice. The last part, the clear liquids, was all a person could have the day before. But some doctors theorized that the newer preps could do the job without the diet, still stripping everything in their path.

I, however, still believe in the old diet. As a patient who has more colonoscopies than I care to remember, the diet helps to eliminate the bulk of the feces prior to prep, leaving less to evacuate. It also makes the liquid fast easier to tolerate for me. I also add a Ducolax tablet two nights before the blessed event to help get some of the heavy lifting out of the way first. My feeling is that if I can get the prep done in one dose, I have eliminated some of the misery. I also add clear electrolyte beverages like Gatorade or Pedialyte to the diet, sipping them almost constantly in the two days before the test. This will help to boost some of your electrolyte levels as many electrolytes are lost during the prep, leaving some people to feel cold, shaky and faint. I am not a fan of Gatorade but I love the Pedialyte as it tastes almost like Kool-Aid. I mix a bit of the orange flavor with Canada Dry ginger ale and crushed ice, a sort-of pre-colonoscopy cocktail.

For swallowing the nasty prep liquids, the rules for swallowing yucky things apply again; only this time, you may have more options than you do in a hospital setting. With the Go-Litely and Nu-Litely, you can add a little Crystal Lite for a bit of flavor. Lemons or limes dipped in sugar and tucked into the cheek counterbalance the salty flavor as well as can hard candy. Some people also swear by having the liquid as cold as possible. If you do this, be aware that you might have a sudden, sharp headache more commonly known as brain freeze.

Do not stray away from the bathroom. In fact, have it as stocked as it can be. You will need KY Jelly or Vaseline, the hemorrhoidal cream, the special toilet paper or baby wipes, reading material, bedtime clothing, a bath towel, the aromatherapy tools and anything else you can think of to add to your comfort. One friend of mine hauls in her television for the event.

You may feel somewhat nauseous and this is natural. Use cold cloths on your forehead or splash cold water on your face to fend off vomiting. Pacing helps as well but don’t go too far from the bathroom because soon you will have an urge to go that you have never known before.

Before you begin to empty out, it helps a bit to coat your anus with the KY Jelly or Vaseline. The velocity of which your intestinal contents exit pared with the volume of the intestinal contents and the fact that some unabsorbed digestive enzymes will find their way out can make for a very sore anus and rectum. To ward this off a bit, it helps to thoroughly coat the anus and anal canal with the petroleum products. As the emptying begins, use the gentle wipes and flush often.

As the bowel evacuation subsides, you may feel cold and weak with muscle cramps. At this time, I usually draw a hot bath filled with scented bath crystals or oils and surround it with scented candles. This is soothing. If I still feel the urge to go, I am two steps from the toilet and a bath towel is always nearby. Before getting into my nightgown, I use a little soothing hemorrhoidal cream.

Following the first part of the prep, most doctors allow their patients to continue drinking clear liquids until midnight. This is important as the bowel cleanse solutions often draw in water from the body; paired with the diarrhea during the prep, this can make you dehydrated. Try to shoot for at least 24 ounces if you can. Also, if you are particularly nervous, a glass or white wine or a shot of vodka both count as clear liquids in my book and can help you to sleep.

On the day of the test, you will be asked to disrobe. Women may have to take a pregnancy test. An IV will be inserted in your arm before you are wheeled into the endoscopy suite. Draping will cover your body and your doctor will place a sedative in your IV. Usually, the painkiller Demerol is used with the sedative Valium and Versed, a short-term amnesia drug. Another option is to use a short-term anesthesia, administered by an anesthesiologist. While you are out, your doctor will insert the endoscopic tool and examine the colon, taking biopsies as well.

The next thing you should remember is waking up in recovery. You may be given juice to drink. When you are able to stand up, you can get dressed. The doctor who performed the test will discuss his or her findings with you and with the person who drove you to the test before you are allowed to leave. You may be woozy the rest of the day but you should recover by the next day.

If you experience sharp pain or a lot of bleeding, you should call the doctor. Rarely, a perforation of the intestines can occur.




--------------------
Heather is the Administrator of the IBS Message Boards. She’s the author of Eating for IBS and The First Year: IBS, and the CEO of Heather's Tummy Care. Join her IBS Newsletter. Meet Heather on Facebook!

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | (show all)


Extra information
0 registered and 1 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  Heather 

Print Thread

Permissions
      You cannot post until you login
      You cannot reply until you login
      HTML is enabled
      UBBCode is enabled

Thread views: 145188

 
Jump to

| Privacy statement Help for IBS Home

*
UBB.threads™ 6.2



LEGAL DISCLAIMER - This website is not intended to replace the services of a physician, nor does it constitute a doctor-patient relationship. Information on this web site is provided for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosing or treating a medical or health condition. If you have or suspect you have an urgent medical problem, promptly contact your professional healthcare provider.

Any application of the recommendations in this website is at the reader's discretion. Heather Van Vorous, HelpForIBS.com, and Heather & Company for IBS, LLC are not liable for any direct or indirect claim, loss or damage resulting from use of this website and/or any web site(s) linked to/from it. Readers should consult their own physicians concerning the recommendations on these message boards.



Home | Shop for IBS | IBS Message Boards | IBS News & Reviews | IBS Support Groups
IBS Diet & Recipes | IBS Books | IBS Supplements | Yoga for IBS | Hypnosis for IBS
IBS Tummy Teas™ | Irritable Bowel Syndrome Glossary

About Us | IBS Links | Search this Site | Site Map | Shipping & Returns | Privacy & Security
Contact Us | For Doctors & Dietitians | Wholesale | Co-packing Services

© 1999-2009, Heather Van Vorous, HelpForIBS.com, Heather & Company for IBS, LLC.
All information & art is proprietary and may not be duplicated.
All rights reserved.

Legal & Medical Disclaimer

Website Design